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Radar Wind Profiler Typical Performance Specifications Radar frequency


Maximum altitude Peak power


Height resolution Time resolution


Deployment Options


 Standard, fixed land-based site  Rapidly deployable trailer-based system  Shipboard system for ocean-atmosphere studies  Doppler Beam Swinging (DBS) or spaced antenna profiling


 Additional sensors include sodar, RASS, lidar, ceilom- eter, GPS water vapor, disdrometer, and sky camera


Basic Overview


The Integrated Sounding System (ISS) is a self-contained meteorological observing system that combines surface, sounding and remote sensing instrumentation to provide a comprehensive description of lower atmospheric thermo- dynamics and winds. The core instruments are a GPS Ad- vanced Upper-Air Sounding (GAUS) rawinsonde system, a radar wind profiler for high-resolution measurements of wind components from the surface to the mid-troposphere, a radio acoustic sounding system for virtual temperature profiles, and meteorological stations that collect surface wind, pressure, thermodynamics, radiation and precipita- tion data. Other instruments can be added as needed.


A modular 449-megahertz radar wind profiler system is being developed to provide extended altitude coverage and greater flexibility. The new system will be deployable in various configurations ranging from a network of bound- ary layer profilers to a full-troposphere radar. Spaced an- tenna techniques enable the system to make rapid wind measurements.


Typical Research Applications


The ISS has been used on a wide variety of research programs. Topics include boundary layer evolution, mountain weather, ocean-atmosphere interactions, tropical meteorology, severe weather, air quality, atmospheric chemistry, aviation safety, precipitation, lake effects, sensor development, and education. The system is highly configurable to meet the needs of a particular study.


915 MHz 2–4 km 400 W


60–200 m 10–30 min


449 MHz 4–10 km 2–16 kW


100–300 m 1–10 min


Mobile ISS at the T-REX (Terrain-induced Rotor Experiment) research site in Independence, CA.


Contact


ISF Manager Dr. Stephen Cohn cohn@ucar.edu 303.497.8826


Lead Scientist Dr. William Brown wbrown@ucar.edu 303.497.8774


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