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How does a scientific platform get added to the Deployment Pool?


The decision is made by NSF on an as needed basis and depends on the current mix of existing facilities. The most recent addition to the Deployment Pool is the CIRPAS A-10, which will come on line in 2015.


Does the Deployment Pool fund expenses associated with facilities that are operated by groups other than the LAOF Partner Organizations?


Not at the present time. For example, if a Learjet is hired by a private company to sup- port dropsonde operations, the deployment pool will fund the expendables and the staff needed to drop the sondes, but the NSF Program Manager will provide special funds to pay for the actual aircraft operations.


Does the NSF Deployment Pool fund campaigns led by NCAR investigators?


Yes. Since NCAR is funded through the NSF/UCAR Cooperative Agreement, requests by NCAR-led investigators are considered NSF-funded.


Observing Facilitates Assessment Panel (OFAP) Questions


Who are the LAOF Partner Organizations? The LAOF Partner Organizations are a consortium of five institutions that manage and operate the Lower Atmospheric Observing Facilities on behalf of NSF. The Partner Organizations include the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR), Colo- rado State University (CSU), the University of Wyoming (UWY), the Center for Severe Weather Research (CSWR) and the Center for Interdisciplinary Remotely-Piloted Aircraft Studies (CIRPAS). All five NSF LAOF partner organizations provide support directly to the science community on facility needs and capabilities, as well as process their requests for use in coordination with NSF.


What is the difference between a large and a small campaign?


The process for considering requests and setting priorities is determined on the basis of the complexity of a field campaign, which would fall into one of two distinct categories – Large projects require significant resources. They are often referred to as “complex“ or “costly” and display one or more of the following attributes: remote or international deployments, significant international and/or interagency collaboration, a large investi- gator team, involvement of multiple facilities, especially aircraft that require operations coordination, difficult deployment logistics, and lengthy field activities. Small proj- ects are of more modest scope as they generally domestic, involve a smaller number of facilities and participants, do not require long-term planning, and cost less than $1.25 Million in deployment pool funds, though this is not a hard threshold.


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