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NCAR HCR CSWR DOW


The Center for Severe Weather Research’s Doppler on Wheels (DOW) radars are truck-borne Doppler radars, frequently deployed in a multiple-Doppler network. The DOW network is an adaptable/targetable radar network able to deploy close to meteorological and other phenomena in order to get fine- scale spatial and temporal observations.


The HIAPER Cloud Radar (HCR) is an airborne millimeter- wavelength radar that serves the atm- ospheric science community by pro- viding remote sens- ing capabilities to the HIAPER aircraft. The HCR is also operable in a ground-based mode.


NCAR HSRL


The High-Spectral Resolution Lidar (HSRL) is used to make reliable and accurate measure- ments of atmo- spheric extinction, backscatter coeffi- cients, optical depth, and discrimination between ice and water clouds. The HSRL was designed and built by the University of Wisconsin Lidar Group to fly on the HIAPER aircraft. It can also be config- ured as a stand-alone instrument to collect data from the ground.


UW WCR


The Wyoming Cloud Radar (WCR) is an airborne radar for the study of cloud structure and dynamics. It is installed principally on the UW King Air, but also can be mounted on the NSF/NCAR C-130. It is capable of simultaneously obtaining measurements above, below, and to the side of the aircraft. It is owned and operated by the University of Wyoming.


UW WCL


The Wyoming Cloud Lidar (WCL) measures backscatter intensity and depolarization from aerosols and cloud particles. Two independent systems are capable of viewing above and below the aircraft, installed either on the UW King Air or the NSF/NCAR C-130. The measurements from the WCL (and at times combined with the WCR) can be used to determine comprehensive cloud and aerosol macrophysical and microphysical property characteristics.


NCAR ISS NCAR AVAPS


The Airborne Vertical Atmospheric Profiling System (dropsonde system) provides unprecedented high vertical resolution of pressure, temperature, humidity, and winds from the drop elevation down to the surface. It has been used exten- sively for hurricane and cyclone research.


The Integrated Sounding System (ISS) combines sur- face, sounding, and remote sensing instrumentation to provide a compre- hensive description of lower atmospheric thermodynamics and winds, with enhanced measure- ments in the bound- ary layer and lower troposphere. The ISS can be deployed in a mobile configura- tion, used on board a ship, or installed at research sites.


The system also can include:


NCAR GAUS


A balloon-borne, rawinsonde system allows researchers to supplement opera- tional soundings by placing sounding systems in essential locations and by launching sondes at higher or variable frequencies. The GAUS provides high vertical resolution measurements of temperature, humid- ity, pressure, and winds.


NCAR ISFS


The Integrated Surface Flux System (ISFS) is designed to study exchange processes between the atmosphere and Earth’s surface. This includes the direct measurement of fluxes of momentum, sensible and latent heat, trace gases, and radiation, as well as standard atmospheric and surface variables. With multiple sensors and data systems, measurements of horizontal and vertical gradients also can be made.


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