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Welcome


Welcome to the Digital Guide to the National Science Foundation’s Lower Atmospheric Observing Facilities. You’re about to begin a tour of an unparalleled set of atmospheric research platforms and meteorological instrumentation. Through text, video, infographics, maps, timelines, and downloadable content, you’ll learn about each of


the available research facilities and the extraordinary


support services that go with them. You will also find out how to request these state-of-the-art platforms and instruments for your own field research.


Across the globe, as researchers tackle the big questions in the atmospheric sciences, Lower Atmospheric Observing Facilities (LAOF) platforms and instruments will play an integral role in taking geosciences research to the next level. These cutting-edge facilities, which include aircraft, radars, lidars, and surface and sounding systems, are available to all qualified U.S. researchers at no extra cost to their scientific grant.


Supported by the National Science Foundation (NSF), the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) Earth Observing Laboratory (EOL), along with four partner organizations— the University of Wyoming (UW), Colorado State University (CSU), the Center for Severe Weather Research (CSWR), and the Center for Interdisciplinary Remotely-Piloted Aircraft Studies (CIRPAS)—manages and operates the LAOF.


EOL and its partner organizations have over 40 years of experience providing field deployment planning and implementation to the atmospheric research community. Our staff will work with you through the entire life cycle of a campaign, which often begins years ahead of the actual field work, to ensure you collect the highest-quality data sets and meet your scientific goals.


Our scientists, engineers, project managers, pilots, software engineers, and data managers are available to provide advice at all stages of a project and will tailor their support to each project’s needs, allowing you to concentrate on the most important aspect—your science.


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