This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
As dealerships look to expand their pre-


cision departments and defi ne the roles of specialists, this will likely allow them to explore additional service opportunities. Interest is there among dealers to incorporate paid precision equipment service plans for customers. At this point, 29.8% of respon-


dents say they offer a precision ser- vice package to include elements like software updates, phone support, RTK signal correction, on-farm train- ing and a discounted hourly rate for billable service. One objective for a Missouri dealer


is to start charging more for the ser- vices offered and getting a larger per- centage of customer understanding for the need to do so. Nearly every dealership offers pre-


cision equipment installation for cus- tomers (96.6%), in-season technology support (86.4%), pre-season set up and training (78%) and yield monitor calibration (71.2%). Mapping services and signal sub-


Projected 5-Year Precision Farming Revenue Sources Least


Most Important or Important


1. GPS & Guidance


2. Application Technology 3. Planter Controls 4. Software Service


5. Customer Training/Seminars 6. Signal Subscriptions


7. Data Management Service 8. Variable Rate Fertilizer 9. Agronomic Service 10. Water Management


91.0% 85.8% 76.9% 75.0% 74.1% 71.4% 67.9% 60.8% 57.1% 39.4%


Important 9.0%


14.2% 23.1% 25.0% 25.9% 28.6% 32.1% 39.2% 42.9% 60.6%


Dealers project that precision hardware will remain their primary source of preci- sion farming income in fi ve years, while water management ranked lowest on the list of priorities.


scriptions — both at 61% — are emerging services while only 8.5% of dealers offer soil sampling.


Managing Data Perhaps the service generating the


most buzz as new revenue sources is data management. Currently 31.1% of dealers offer data management service in conjunc- tion with sales of precision farming products, while another 31.1% say


PRECISIONFARMINGDEALER.COM ••••• 2013 011


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56