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ARTICLE | THEAGEING MALE |


A CONSIDERATION OF AGEING


PROCEDURES FOR MEN:


COSMETIC


Catherine De Goursac considers the treatment of male patients in the cosmetic clinic, and how attitudes to treatment are changing among this patient cohort


CATHERINE DE GOURSAC, MD, is Cosmetic Practitioner, Centre Medical Niel, Cabinet Medical, Paris, France


email: centremedicalniel@gmail.com


ABSTRACT The requirements of men with regard to aesthetics are quite different to those of females in terms of a general goal, as well as procedure. It is often the case that men are looking for a greater sex appeal with quicker, more radical treatments, while women usually aim to please themselves and desire something more preventive and less obvious. Ageing itself is also very different between men and women. The hormone testosterone influences a number of qualities of the epidermis and dermis, including thickness, vascularity, sweat and sebaceous glands, and fat and bone resorption. The beauty care applied to and by women cannot be transferred to men. It is the role of the aesthetic practitioner to adapt this to the male patient, matching precise specifications, and providing male patients with treatments that meet their expectations.


M


KEYWORDS men, ageing, hormones, cosmetic procedures


18 ❚


global trend. Indeed, when the author began her career as a cosmetic practitioner during the 1980s, men accounted for only 5% of the patient cohort, but have now grown to represent 20%.


ALE DEMAND FOR COSMETIC treatments has been rapidly increasing over the past few years. Not only do men want to look younger and more attractive, but they are also aiming to smooth


over the signs of fatigue in order to appear more capable and competitive at work, for example. They seem to have understood that, in order to boost their professional career, taking care of their image is just one more necessary factor. The rush of male patients into cosmetic surgery and aesthetic medicine has, in fact, become a


November/December 2012 | prime-journal.com


Changing objectives and demand At the beginning of the author’s career, male patients could be easily divided into two sub-groups. Firstly, homosexual men, whose demand for treatments resembled that of many female patients by targeting wrinkles, skin laxity, and ill-looking skin, for example. The second group encompassed heterosexual men, whose demands were rather stereotypical, covering rosacea and brown spots, for example. At present, men account for approximately 20% of the


author’s practice, but the distribution has changed. Homosexual men account for up to 80% of this patient cohort, with the remaining 20% being heterosexual. However, differences in the demands of these groups can no longer be easily distinguished; both groups want to look well, reduce the signs of fatigue, and appear more competitive. The objective seems to have shifted from an impact on private life to a desire to improve performance in the evermore demanding socio–professional world. A more detailed analysis of the expectations of male patients reveals that those over 50 years of age seek


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