This book includes a plain text version that is designed for high accessibility. To use this version please follow this link.
forward thinking Dave Lutz, CMP


Fool’s Gold BREAKOUT Terminology Lesson


Credentialing is an umbrella term most often used to describe various types of formal recognition programs, including accreditation, certification, certificate programs, and licensure.


Accreditation is a volunteer process whereby a third-party organization grants recognition to an organization, system, or program after verifying that it has met predetermined criteria.


A certification is a voluntary process in which an organization grants recognition to an individual after that individual has met eligibility criteria, including demonstrating a minimal degree of competency, possessing a specific number of years of experience and a minimum level of education, and passing an assessment.


A certificate program is an education program that does not provide a degree. It is usually a series of education sessions designed to achieve a specific scope with designated learning outcomes. Upon verifying that specific requirements were met and usually after the individual has passed some type of evaluation, the certificate is awarded.


A licensure is when a governmental agency or its designated agent grants recognition to an individual after verifying that the individual has met eligibility criteria, including demonstrating a minimal degree of competency and passing an assessment. To maintain the license, the individual has to meet ongoing requirements such as CEUs, renewal fees, and retesting. Licensure is a legal mandate.


40 PCMA CONVENE SEPTEMBER 2012


Continuing Education Units (CEUs) or continuing education credits are oſten mistaken for the primary reason why attendees go to conferences. They’re important — but no longer the main attraction.


S


ince CEUs are public domain, there are no mandated guide- lines for instruction or learning


activities. And there’s a preponderance of information and online education programs available today for people to receive CEUs or credit — from reading an article and passing a short quiz (as is the case with Convene’s monthly CMP Series), to listening to a podcast, attend- ing a webinar, or participating in a self- paced online course. It’s not a stretch to say CEUs have been commoditized. Then there is the issue of price,


which is all over the board. From my independent research, I’ve found that some organizations charge $50 to $85 per hour of instruction, with the aver- age for trade associations with multiple hours of education and supplemental trade-show revenue in the $20-to-$30- per-hour range. Online CEU options are often


offered for as little as $5 per course hour — or even free of charge. In fact, MIT is offering free education online to anyone who wants to take advantage of its program. Participants can’t earn a degree, but those who demonstrate a mastery of the subject taught will receive an official certificate of comple- tion (convn.org/MIT-free). These alternatives to receiving


credits via conference attendance drive down the value of premium face-to-face education. Conference organizers that market CEUs or education credits as their main value proposition are not going to be able to maintain registra- tion prices. And the CEU becomes nothing more


than fool’s gold.


CEU REALITY CHECK Since no government or private agency is charged with setting and enforcing mandatory credentialing standards, the good news is that any organization is free to develop credentialing programs when, how, and for whom it wants. The bad news is that it is incredibly confus- ing for everyone, since the terminology is applied inconsistently. (See Breakout, at left, for some clarification on terms.) Another challenge with continuing


education programs is that there is not one set of industry standards to guide program development and administra- tion. There are myriad self-appointed organizations, including ANSI, CLEAR, and IACET — each claiming to be the official standard for credentialing. They all require membership as well as ongoing evaluation, regular site visits, maintenance of credentialing records, and ongoing annual fees to distribute their trademarked credentialing requirements. ASAE’s “Decision to Learn” research,


released in 2010, indicated that the higher the level of education that people have, the less likely they are to pursue certification. In other words, the more educated your attendees are, the less likely they want to attend confer- ences to obtain CEUs. Similarly, ASAE’s study found that


it’s those individuals who are self- employed who are more likely to be certified or seek certification. Profes- sionals in the public sector or from cor- porations do not feel the same need to attend conference education programs in order to receive CEUs. I have yet to find an organization


PCMA.ORG


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92  |  Page 93  |  Page 94  |  Page 95  |  Page 96  |  Page 97  |  Page 98  |  Page 99  |  Page 100  |  Page 101  |  Page 102  |  Page 103  |  Page 104  |  Page 105  |  Page 106  |  Page 107  |  Page 108  |  Page 109  |  Page 110  |  Page 111  |  Page 112