This book includes a plain text version that is designed for high accessibility. To use this version please follow this link.
Indy at all hours Tour the Circle City via the new eight-mile Cultural Trail (above), or check out the endless shopping and dining options on Mass Ave (bottom right). Aſter sunset, enjoy live music outdoors at Te Rathskeller Biergarten (right).


Local Flavor


Indulge in the diabolical shrimp cocktail at the legendary St. Elmo Steak House, an Indianapolis landmark since 1902, named by Forbes magazine as one of the world’s


“10 Great Classic Restaurants Well Worth Visiting.” Or grab a pint at the Slippery Noodle Inn, the Midwest’s premier blues bar, patronized by everyone from Harrison Ford to Dave Matthews. Founded in 1850, the Noodle is Indiana’s oldest bar, and has a history as part of the Underground Railroad. Te Slippery Noodle Inn offers live blues music seven days a week, and serves a full menu that runs the gamut from sandwiches to steaks.


Green Convenience


Indianapolis’ new Cultural Trail has garnered international attention. Te city removed a lane of traffic along its main thoroughfares in order to make room for the eight-mile, bike- and pedestrian-friendly trail, which connects visitors to six cultural districts, restaurants, attractions, hotels, and meeting venues. Take a guided tour, or rent a bike and explore the city solo.


Unconventional Expansion


Te Indiana Convention Center expanded in 2011 to nearly double in size and capacity, and Lucas Oil Stadium provides 183,000 square feet of contiguous convention space, two exhibit halls, 12 meeting rooms, and 11 load- ing docks. Its easily retractable roof can bring attendees the sky in minutes, or be closed should the weather turn inclement. Te stadium houses 63,000 permanent seats, with adjustable capacity for up to 73,000 people — and a breathtaking view of the skyline. Together, the convention center and stadium offer 749,000 square feet of exhibit space, and it’s all only a short walk from the 18,345-seat Bankers Life Fieldhouse, home of the Indiana Pacers.


thriving local breweries, or treat attendees to farm-to-table delights from James Beard Award–winning chefs at R Bistro or Recess. Visit Robert Indiana’s original LOVE sculpture, which sits on 152 acres of pristine gardens and grounds at the Indianapolis Museum of Art. Attendees can also enjoy the outdoors at White River State


Park, a cultural urban state park in the heart of downtown complete with the scenic Central Canal. The park offers 250 acres of green space and entertainment, and is home to attrac- tions like the Indianapolis Zoo and White River Gardens. Explore the NCAA Hall of Champions, offering tons of inter- active games and exhibits, or grab your mitt and head to Sports Illustrated’s best minor league ballpark in the United States, Victory Field, offering more than 12,000 seats and room for 2,000 on the lawn. Learn Hoosier history at the Indiana State Museum, or Native American culture at the Eiteljorg Museum of American Indians and Western Art. Tour White River State Park via bike, boat, or Segway. It’s no surprise that Indianapolis is one of the top 25 most-


visited cities in the United States — because there is an end- less list of reasons to “do Indy.”


For more information: VisitIndy.com INDIANAPOLIS


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92  |  Page 93  |  Page 94  |  Page 95  |  Page 96  |  Page 97  |  Page 98  |  Page 99  |  Page 100  |  Page 101  |  Page 102  |  Page 103  |  Page 104  |  Page 105  |  Page 106  |  Page 107  |  Page 108  |  Page 109  |  Page 110  |  Page 111  |  Page 112