This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
Page 3


ElectraLite


Replace smoke alarm batteries Can’t remember to replace the batteries in your home’s smoke


alarms? Tie the chore to an important event, like your birthday or the first day of school. Some people replace their batteries twice a year, on the day they set their clocks back an hour in the fall and again when they set them ahead in the spring.


In fact, you should replace those batteries twice a year, even if


the you’re not quite worn out. That way, you won’t risk of having dead batteries if there’s a fire at your home. The batteries in a wall-mounted smoke alarm are easy to replace. Simply remove the device from the wall, remove the old battery and insert the new one. Test to make sure the battery is well-placed and operating correctly by pushing the test button on the front of the alarm cas- ing. Then, test the batteries again once a month. Replace the smoke detector itself if it breaks or once it’s 10 years old. Overtime, a smoke detector’s sensors can wear down from coming into constant contact with particles in indoor air, like cigarette smoke, pollen and pet dander. That can make the unit unreliable. Once that hap- pens, the alarm will become either hyper-sensitive and go off all the time, or can become desensitized so it never sounds.


Just say no to unsolicited home repairs


Just as surely as the daffodils will bloom when the weather warms up, scam-artist home- improvement “contractors” will turn up in your neighborhood.


If someone knocks on your door to tell you he has just finished working on your neighbor’s roof, driveway and he has a great deal for you, too, just say “no.” Just ask to see the solicitor’s state contrac-


tor’s license, and he’ll go away. He doesn’t have one.


One of the most common springtime scams involves air conditioner tune-ups. Sure, you need a licensed a/c tech to give your unit a once-over at the beginning of the cooling season. It will cost you around $100, and if the contractor finds a problem, you’ll get an explanation and an offer to resolve a minor problem like replacing a belt or adding refrigerant.


If the service tech finds a bigger problem, you’ll be given a written estimate and time to decide if you want to get a second opinion or proceed with the repairs.


But if you say “yes” to a stranger who knocks


on your door offering to perform that tune-up for free, it’s a good bet you will hear that your a/c has an urgent problem that will cost thousands of dollars to fix—even if it’s not really broken. Don’t fall for it. Unless you know an awful lot about cooling technology, you won’t have a clue if this is an honest assessment. Your best bet: Do not hire anybody off the street or whose name you got from a flier someone left on your front door. Instead, call a licensed, local air condition- ing business that’s been around for a long time and will schedule a maintenance check for you. Professionals do not go door-to-door.


CANADIAN VALLEY ELECTRIC COOPERATIVE 73rd Annual Meeting September 15, 2012


Shawnee Heart of Oklahoma Exposition Center located at U.S. Highway 177 and Independence Registration —10 a.m. Business Meeting — 1 p.m.


2012 Events Include: Health Fair, live music Gifts include: CVEC hat & registration gift, door prizes Lunch —11 a.m.


Additional meal tickets may be purchased for $5 Keep first aid kits handy


A well-stocked first aid kit is a handy thing to have. To be prepared for emergencies, keep a first aid kit in your home and in your automo- bile. Carry a first aid kit with you or know where you can find one when you are hiking, biking, camping or boating. Find out the location of first aid kits where you work. First aid kits come in many shapes and sizes. You can buy one from the Red Cross, drug store or you can make your own kit. Some kits are designed for special activities such as hiking, camping or boating.


Whether you buy a first aid kit or put one together, make sure it has all the items you may need. Include any personal items, such as medications and emergency phone numbers, or other items your physi- cian may suggest.


Check the kit regularly. Make sure the flashlight batteries work. Check expiration dates and replace any used or out-of-date contents. The contents of a first aid kit can be dangerous in the hands of young children. Store your first aid kit in a secure place out of the reach of young children.


The hidden account number hidden in the August edition of The ElectraLite is worth $25. Remember the contest rules as you search. 1. The account number must be your own and found within the contents of the paper. 2. Your number must be reported by the 15th of each month. 3. You must report to our office by phone, mail or in person.


AUGUST 2012


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92  |  Page 93  |  Page 94  |  Page 95  |  Page 96  |  Page 97  |  Page 98  |  Page 99  |  Page 100  |  Page 101  |  Page 102  |  Page 103  |  Page 104  |  Page 105  |  Page 106  |  Page 107  |  Page 108  |  Page 109  |  Page 110  |  Page 111  |  Page 112  |  Page 113  |  Page 114  |  Page 115  |  Page 116  |  Page 117  |  Page 118  |  Page 119  |  Page 120  |  Page 121  |  Page 122  |  Page 123  |  Page 124  |  Page 125  |  Page 126  |  Page 127  |  Page 128  |  Page 129  |  Page 130  |  Page 131  |  Page 132  |  Page 133  |  Page 134  |  Page 135  |  Page 136  |  Page 137  |  Page 138  |  Page 139  |  Page 140  |  Page 141  |  Page 142  |  Page 143  |  Page 144  |  Page 145  |  Page 146  |  Page 147  |  Page 148