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GREEN-DOT Continued from Page 7


She was very appreciative of the information we gave her,” Hawkins said. In Ada, Okla., a People’s Electric Cooperative (PEC) member also fell victim to the Green- Dot Prepaid Card scam. This time, a Hispanic gentleman, who always paid his bills in advance, purchased a $500 Green-Dot Prepaid card. He received a similar after-hours call from someone stating they were collecting payment on behalf of PEC. According to PEC’s Senior Vice President of Administrative Services, Carlton Tilley, the member—who bought the Green-Dot Prepaid Card at a local Walgreens in May—called PEC when he got his June bill and saw that he had no credit in his account for the $500 he had paid. “We instructed the member to call the local Sheriff’s offi ce,” Tilley said. “It’s very unfortu- nate. We wonder how they are doing this and how they know our members.” Tilley said PEC sends a written notice to members who have missed a payment. The co- op may also distribute door hangers to warn of possible cutoff or give a courtesy call to the member about their past-due account.


A Hispanic member of Harmon Electric Association based in Hollis, Okla., reported a simi- lar call, requesting that they purchase a Green-Dot Prepaid card or have their power discon- nected.


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Some local media channels have reported the Green-Dot Prepaid Purchase card scam is tar- geting utility customers, mostly of Hispanic or Latino ethnicity. The Oklahoma Association of Electric Cooperatives (OAEC)—a service-oriented organization representing Oklahoma’s 28 distribution electric cooperatives—has alerted cooperatives about the potential danger of elderly members also becoming targets. “We at OAEC would strongly suggest that all of our co-ops’ customer service representatives be informed of this apparent scam and be on the alert for this kind of activity in their local cooperative service area,” said Sid Sperry, OAEC’s director of public relations, communica- tions and research. “We have notifi ed offi cials at the Oklahoma Corporation Commission and they have in turn contacted the Oklahoma Attorney General’s offi ce.” Any co-op member who happens to receive a request for a Green-Dot Prepaid card purchase is urged to contact the Oklahoma Attorney General’s (AG) offi ce, Public Protection Unit, at the following phone numbers: Oklahoma City—405-521-3921; Tulsa—918-581-2885. More information about the AG’s Public Protection Unit can be found on their website at: http:// www.oag.ok.gov/oagweb.nsf/consumer!openpage. OL


Continued from Page 9 OPSU


on the communities they jointly serve, the cooperative plans to continue supporting the Uni- versity however possible. “While we’ve provided fi nancial support to the University in the past and plan to continue to do so, we continually look for new ways to partner with OPSU,” Perkins said. “One thing we’re doing is looking at helping the University be proactive in managing their energy use. Technol- ogy is ever evolving to where we may be able to offer the University special tools and support.” Perkins himself is one of the OPSU graduates employed by Tri-County Electric. Other gradu- ates hired by the cooperative include Information Technology Manager Joel Gerber, Infor- mation Technology Specialist Mandy Chavez, Accounts Payable Specialist Jody Hodges, and Construction Manager Rick Wayman.


When talking about the University’s Guymon Classroom, Bryant said it’s more of a concept


than just a building. It helps the University establish relationships with entities in the com- munity. It’s a concept they’re trying to expand to other Panhandle towns like Beaver and Boise City where the University is a member of their Chamber of Commerce organizations. It’s that concept that helps students like Martinez of Boise City feel at home at OPSU. OL


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