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PAGE 2 | AUGUST 2012


Things like yearbook ads, sports programs, bottled water, FFA programs and specialized equipment. For the 2011-2012 school year, Tri-County Electric Cooperative moved


away from contributing to school projects on an individual basis. Instead, the cooperative donates one large sum based on student enrollment. Schools in the cooperative’s service territory are annually awarded $5 per student with a minimum of $1,500 to each school. Schools then use the funds where needed. As the largest school system in the cooperative’s territory, Guymon Public


Schools received the largest donation. For the high school, those dollars went toward activities like FFA, yearbook, sports, Alma Folklorica, academic team and dance team. “Guymon Public Schools appreciates the monetary support that


Tri-County Electric has generously given,” Superintendent Doug Melton said. “This is a great partnership that benefi ts our students.” At Guymon’s Junior High School, Tri-County Electric’s dollars helped fund activities like the Halo organization, special education, yearbook, student council and sports. Elementary schools chose to spend their dollars in various ways. Some purchased educational materials, while others purchased physical education equipment, according to Melton. “Schools have such a variety of needs,” said Tri-County Electric’s Vice


Support for schools makes a difference C


By JuliAnn Graham, Communication Specialist


hildren deserve the best possible tools to support their education in local schools. Frequently, schools turn to the community for support when they need something their budget doesn’t have room for.


2011 OKLAHOMA GROSS RECEIPTS TAX ALLOCATION


School Felt


Balko Beaver


Boise City Forgan


Goodwell Guymon Hardesty Hooker Keyes


Optima Straight Texhoma Turpin Tyrone


President of Corporate Services Zac Perkins. “We felt one large donation would better serve them since they could then fulfi ll those needs as they saw fi t. This method also ensures our charitable gifts are more equally distributed.” As the donations to area schools illustrates, educating youth in the cooperative’s service territory is of utmost importance to the


166 222 441 93


Yarbrough TOTAL


411


$83,030 $160,852 $92,734 $197,032 $70,844 $63,654 $148,475 $78,131 $116,024 $93,576 $26,092 $54,719 $73,341 $145,456 $30,672 $135,429


4764 $1,570,060


cooperative. But the cooperative’s support doesn’t stop there. “To help our youth understand the cooperative business model and its benefi ts, we offer three different trips to students,” Perkins


said. “During these trips, students learn about leadership and cooperatives.” Students must meet application criteria and enter a competition


to win the trips. Two trips are available to high school students and one is for eighth grade students. The cooperative also offers free safety demonstrations to schools and classroom kits on electricity and effi ciency upon request. Rural electric cooperative members in Oklahoma pay a special


SUBSTATION TECHNICIAN MICHAEL BUSHNELL TEACHES STUDENTS ABOUT ELECTRICAL SAFETY DURING NATURAL RESOURCE DAY 2012 IN GUYMON.


gross receipts tax with their electric bill. This tax directly benefi ts local schools in the cooperative’s service territory, with 95 percent of funds collected being distributed to them. The remaining 5 percent goes toward the state’s administrative costs. This is yet another way electric cooperatives and their members support their local youth. See the chart showing how the Oklahoma gross receipts tax collected in 2011 was allocated. Schools the cooperative serves in Kansas and Texas are not included because the tax is for the state of Oklahoma only. For more information about the cooperative’s school support,


visit its website at www.tri-countyelectric.coop.


Miles of line Dollars 252 489 282 598 215 193 450 237 352 284 79


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