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PROMOTION


THE REFIT COMBINATION


A S LIPOSUCTION, GASTRIC BYPASS


surgery and other fat reduction techniques continue to grow in popularity, post-treatment questions are usually targeted towards the remaining skin. While these procedures


are giving the desired outcome of less fat, there is a leave-behind. As with any sudden fat reduction technique, the skin does not remodel after expanding to accommodate existing fat as quickly or as completely as one would like. In addition, the skin loses elasticity and increased cross-links lead to rigid collagen, thereby preventing recovery of the skin’s original smoothness and tautness. Rather than seeing a smooth physique in the mirror, patients see loose and sagging skin. Previously, the only solution to this problem was


plastic surgery. However, this tactic has its downsides: expense, pain, down-time, and all the inherent risks and complications associated with surgery. And for the many who felt that surgery was not an option — for any or all of these reasons — they are left with excess and redundant skin, unhappy with their body image. However, there is now a viable non-invasive, painless,


and proven alternative for sagging skin: ReFit, the new treatment concept, powered by the Reaction™ device by Viora.


Radiofrequency Usage Owing to its high-efficiency and safety, radiofrequency (RF) energy is widely used in the dermatological field for heating biological tissue for a range of aesthetic applications, including skin tightening, skin lifting, body


Figure 1 (A) After liposuction, before Reaction. (B) After treatment with Reaction


contouring, and cellulite reduction. RF as a source of heat is used for collagen denaturation, which leads to shrinking of redundant or lax connective tissue. Collagen molecules are produced by fibroblast cells in the dermis. The collagen protein is a compound of three polypeptide chains that wrap around one another in a final triple helix structure. The process of thermal shrinkage of collagen starts with denaturation of the triple helix, in which the heat-labile intramolecular cross-links are broken and the collagen undergoes a transition from a highly organised crystalline structure to a random, gel-like state (denaturation). The collagen shrinkage occurs through the cumulative effect of the ‘unwinding’ of the triple helix and the residual tension of the heat-stable intermolecular cross-links. In addition, heated fibroblasts are associated with new collagen synthesis and tissue remodelling as a result. Therefore, the RF effects are based on mild heating of the collagen and elastin fibres, which can lead to collagen shrinkage and dermal thickening, thus improving the firmness and elasticity of the skin. In the aesthetic field, there are typically two RF configurations that are used: monopolar and bipolar. The main difference between these is the way in which the current is controlled and directed to the body. The primary advantage of a bipolar configuration is that the RF current inside the tissue has a controlled distribution that is limited by the volume between the two electrodes. In addition, as bipolar energy is more localised, less energy is required to achieve the same heating effect than the monopolar configuration.


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June 2012 | prime-journal.com


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