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ARTICLE | THE MALE FACE | AESTHETICS FACIAL


MINIMALLY-INVASIVE PROCEDURES


FOR MALES: A FOCUS ON


Aesthetic treatments to the male face require a specific


approach that differs to that for female patients. Uwe Wollina and Alberto Goldman discuss the considerations of anatomy and treatment protocols when dealing with this patient cohort


ABSTRACT The approach to male facial aesthetics is different to that of females. Anatomical, physiological, and psychosocial factors are significant factors to consider, having an impact on aesthetic procedures performed for males. In this article the authors focus on minimally-invasive techniques including radiofrequency, fractional photothermolysis, botulinum toxin A and dermal fillers. Techniques and special needs for the male patient are discussed for the upper-face, mid-face and lower-face. There should be a balance in the improvement of attractiveness and masculinity.


UWE WOLLINA, MD, is Head of the Department of Dermatology and Allergology, Academic Teaching Hospital Dresden-Friedrichstadt, Dresden, Germany; ALBERTO GOLDMAN, MD, Clinia Goldman, Porto Alegre, RS, Brazil


email: wollina-uw@khdf.de


KEYWORDS male facial aesthetics, gender issues, attractiveness, masculinity, minimally-invasive procedures


16 ❚ A


LTHOUGH THE FOCUS IN AESTHETIC medicine is on females, the market for male aesthetics is growing. For both genders, the numbers for minimally-invasive procedures are growing faster than the classical


invasive procedures such as face lift, for example. The approach to male aesthetics requires a specific


approach. This is caused by differences in anatomy, physiology, psychology, and sociology. In this article, the authors will discuss some important issues to consider for common minimally-invasive aesthetic procedures for younger males (aged between 30 and 50 years).


June 2012 | prime-journal.com


Male facial anatomy The male facial anatomy differs in detail from the female counterpart. The bony structures such as the orbital rim, glabella, cheek bones, and chin tend to be more prominent. The glabella width is also a consequence of the strength and volume of the procerus muscle involved in flaring the nostrils and increased air intake during physically-demanding activities. The shape of the male orbit and brows makes the eyes appear smaller. The forehead also has an increased backwards slope from the brows to the hairline. Male noses are rated optimal when their final aesthetic


line below nasion on the lateral view are straight, while in women they can be also concave. A strong lateral columella appearance is considered as a negative factor for male noses. The optimal male upper-lip and philtrum are broader1


. Often, the male venter frontalis musculi


occipitofrontalis and masseter muscles are strongly developed. The subcutaneous fat tissue is characterised by a criss-cross pattern of connective tissue fibres, preventing adipose tissue herniation2


. The impact of testosterone on hair and sebaceous


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