This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
T omson Reuters’ fi nancial division, middle market activity has recovered since its low point in 2009. Aggregate transaction values are back to about 70% of their peak, and the average deal size has regained previous highs (Fig. 1). Rosbrook estimates metalcasting business M&A activity has recovered even more quickly, already surpassing the highs of 2007 (Fig. 2). “Because [2009] was a difficult


Fig. 1. Aggregate middle market mergers and acquisitions values have approached peak levels, while average deal sizes have exceeded the peak.


and the things these foundries need to stay on the [leading] edge.”


Metalcasters in the Middle According to most banking in-


M&AS IN THE NEWS While the headlines in 2009-2010 were dominated by


metalcasting facility closures, 2011-2012 has been a time for acquisitions, reopenings and capacity expansion. Here’s a look at a few of the major announcements from the last calendar year.


CAPACITY EXPANSION TKW Reopens, Expands Shuttered Plant 6 July 28, 2011—Thyssen-


Krupp Waupaca (TKW), Waupaca, Wis., announced it would resume production at its Plant 6 in Etowah, Tenn., in January 2012, and add approximately 20,000 sq. ft. of new manufacturing space to the facility. The company said the decision was made in response to increasing market demand for gray and ductile iron castings. “The reopening of our


Etowah foundry is good news for our customers and for the state of Tennessee, but also for the men and women we will be able to put back to work,” said Gary Gigante, TKW president and chief executive offi cer. “Our facility is one of the most techno-


logically advanced in the iron castings industry, and we are proud to once again be open for business.”


Eagle Alloy Adds Capacity, Thermal Reclamation Unit October 25, 2011—Steel caster Eagle Alloy, Muskegon, Mich., announced it will add 70,000 sq. ft. of manufacturing space to its existing shell molding facility. According to the company’s top executives, Eagle expects to spend $14 mil-


dustry metrics, middle market deals concern companies worth less than $1 billion. Most metalcasters (indeed almost all) fall into this category. According to data available from


deal environment in many ways, sellers and owners of businesses were internally focused,” Rosbrook said. “Where we are now, we have come back to a good level of deal ac- tivity, and it has become very stable.” T e T omson Financial data


indicates aggregate acquisition activity has tripled from a low of about $20


Technocast was purchased by Tupy in a recent strategic acquisition.


26 | METAL CASTING DESIGN & PURCHASING | Mar/Apr 2012


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68