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INDUSTRY news


Bodine Aluminum Increasing Capacity for Toyota Program Bodine Aluminum Inc., Troy, Mo.,


will spend $10 million to boost annual production capacity in response to a new program announced by Toyota Motor Corp. Bodine will produce 120,000 more


transmission cases and housings for six-speed automatic transmissions than originally budgeted. T e program will create 25 new jobs at Bodine. Toyota said its engine and


transmission manufacturing subsidiary Toyota Motor Manufacturing West Virginia Inc. will further increase its six-speed automatic transmission annual production capacity beyond the previously planned 400,000 units, announced in February 2011 and targeted for the end of 2012, to 520,000 units by the summer of 2013. T e capacity increase represents an additional investment of approximately $45 million and 80 new jobs at the plant. T e West Virginia facility


currently builds six-speed automatic transmissions for Toyota’s Avalon, Camry, Sienna and Venza and Lexus’ RX 350 vehicles built in North America. 


Closed Somerset Plant Seeks Buyer


Ferrous metalcaster Somerset


Foundries, Somerset, Pa., entered talks last month with a potential buyer that intended to continue operating the facility. According to company controller Linda Heining, Somerset will be liquidated if a deal cannot be reached. “We’re hoping to see if we can sell


the property to be operational,” she said. But at some point, Heining said the company will “quit hoping and settle with a liquidator.” T e green sand and nobake


metalcasting facility serves a variety of end-use industries. According to Heining, the company issued its closing notice on Dec. 30, 2011, because it was not profi table. 


Mar/Apr 2012 | METAL CASTING DESIGN & PURCHASING | 15


Bodine Aluminum produces castings for a number of Toyota models. The new transmission program will be focused on models like the Avalon.


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