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INDUSTRY news


New Cement Uses Slag as Primary Constituent Drexel University engineers have


developed a new formulation for cement that utilizes limestone and slag, a waste product produced during melting for the metalcasting process. According to a statement by the


university, the product is more energy effi cient and cost eff ective than ordinary Portland cement because it does not require heating to produce. According to Michel Barsoum, A.W. Grosvenor professor in Drexel’s Department of Materials Science and Engineering, this alternative production method and the availability of the ingredients lessens the cost of


materials for the cement by about 40% versus Portland cement and reduces energy consumption and carbon dioxide production by 97%. “Cement consumption is rapidly


rising, and it’s already responsible for 5% of human-made carbon dioxide,” said Alex Moseson, one of the lead researchers on the project. Drexel’s cement is made of up to


68% unfi red limestone, a plentiful, cheap and low-carbon dioxide resource. American Society for Testing and Materials’ standards for Portland cement limit the amount to 5%. A small amount of commercial alkali


chemical, along with the iron slag byproduct, is added to this base. In Portland cement, the substitute for this mixture is produced by fi ring a number of ingredients in a kiln. “Our results and the literature


confi rm that [the product] performs as well or better than [Portland cement],” Barsoum said. “We are very close to having the cement pass an important commercialization milestone (ASTM C1157), a standard that judges cement-like products on performance, such as strength and setting-time, regardless of composition.” 


Waukesha Foundry, UWM Team for Scholarship Program


Waukesha Foundry, Waukesha, Wis., has signed a fi ve-year commitment to provide two scholarships a year for students at the Univ. of


Wisconsin-Milwaukee (UWM). According to a company statement,


each scholarship is for $2,500, which covers more than 30% of UWM’s annual


tuition. T e $25,000 in scholarships will be for students in the College of Engineering & Applied Science. UWM is one of the few institutions in Wisconsin with a metalcasting lab, and students can pursue up to doctoral level education in the subject area. “T e relationships that Waukesha


Foundry builds with student engineers will be critical to the company’s ongoing success and technological edge,” said Tien-Chien Jen, interim dean of College of Engineering & Applied Science. Waukesha Foundry makes castings in the nobake and investment processes, among others, for the cast tooling, defense, food processing, petrochemical, and pump and valve markets. 


Waukesha Foundry will provide $25,000 to UWM.


16 | METAL CASTING DESIGN & PURCHASING | Mar/Apr 2012


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