This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
PAGE 6 MARCH 2012 LET’S SAVE ENERGY TOGETHER


How to buy an energy efficient appliance Spending more on an efficient appliance could cost you less over the long term


BY JOHN DRAKE 


Y


ou go shopping for a new refrigerator, and you’re on a budget. The best buy is the fridge with the lowest sales price, right?


Not necessarily. If you buy the lowest- priced refrigerator you may end up spending more than if you buy a more expensive one. The reason? The cost of owning a home appliance has three components: the initial purchase price, the cost of repairs and maintenance, and the cost to operate it.


To figure out how much you’ll spend over the lifetime of the appliance, you need to look at all these factors. The appliance with the lowest purchase price, or even the one with the best repair record, isn’t necessarily the one that costs the least to operate. Here’s an example of how an appliance’s energy consumption can affect your out-of-pocket costs.


The Federal Trade Commission’s Appliance Labeling Rule requires appliance manufacturers to put these labels on appliances such as refrigerators, freezers, and dishwashers, as well as water heaters, furnaces, air conditioners, heat pumps and more.


For an energy-smart deal on your next appliance...





  


Read the EnergyGuide label (required


for refrigerators, freezers, dishwashers, clothes washers, water heaters, and select HVAC systems).


Compare the energy use of competing


models. Estimate their differences in energy


costs. Consider both purchase price and


estimated energy use when deciding which brand and model to buy.


Suppose you’re in the market for a new refrigerator-freezer. Different models of refrigerators with the same capacity can vary dramatically in the amount of electricity they use. For one popular size and configuration, for example, the annual electricity consumption varies across models from a low of about 600 kilowatt-hours (kwh) a year to a high of more than 800 kwh a year. Based on national average electricity prices, that means the annual cost to operate this refrigerator can range from about $50 to $70, depending on the model you buy.


A $20 difference in annual operating costs might not sound like much. But remember that you’ll enjoy these savings year after year for the life of the appliance, while you must pay any difference in purchase price only once. As a result, you may actually save money by buying the more expensive, more energy-efficient model.


You can learn about the energy efficiency of an appliance that you’re thinking about buying through the yellow-and-black EnergyGuide label.


When you shop for one of these appliances, you should find the


labels hanging on the inside of an appliance or secured to the outside. The law requires that the labels specify:


plianc


 


The capacity of the particular model. For refrigerators, freezers, dishwashers,


clothes washers and water heaters, the estimated annual energy consumption of the model.


  For air conditioners, heat pumps,


furnaces, boilers and pool heaters, the energy efficiency rating.


The range of estimated annual energy


consumption, or energy efficiency ratings, of comparable appliances.


Some appliances may feature the ENERGY STAR logo, which means the appliance is significantly more energy efficient than the average model. To compare how updating appliances can impact your electric bill, visit www.TogetherWeSave.com. I think you’ll be surprised at what you could save.


Finally, if the sticker price is the only thing stopping you from purchasing a more efficient appliance, Choctaw Electric can help make it more affordable for you by providing low-interest financing.


We offer loans to members on small and large appliances. We also offer loans on bigger ticket energy upgrades such as new, energy efficient heating and air units, storm windows and doors, and more.


You can find details on our loan programs online at www.choctawelectric.coop, or call 800-780-6486.


Hope to see you at our Energy Saving Workshop on April 10!


If you’d like to speak with a CEC energy use specialist about finding ways to save energy, please call John Drake or Mark Zachry at 800- 780-6486, ext. 233. Remember, CEC offers FREE energy audits for co-op members.


CEC


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92  |  Page 93  |  Page 94  |  Page 95  |  Page 96  |  Page 97  |  Page 98  |  Page 99  |  Page 100  |  Page 101  |  Page 102  |  Page 103  |  Page 104  |  Page 105  |  Page 106  |  Page 107  |  Page 108  |  Page 109  |  Page 110  |  Page 111  |  Page 112  |  Page 113  |  Page 114  |  Page 115  |  Page 116  |  Page 117  |  Page 118  |  Page 119  |  Page 120  |  Page 121  |  Page 122  |  Page 123  |  Page 124  |  Page 125  |  Page 126  |  Page 127  |  Page 128  |  Page 129  |  Page 130  |  Page 131  |  Page 132  |  Page 133  |  Page 134  |  Page 135  |  Page 136  |  Page 137  |  Page 138