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FEBRUARY 2012


Want to Receive Oklahoma Living?


PEC Honored by the Arbor Day Foundation


People’s Electric was recently honored for the eleventh consecutive year as a Tree Line USA Utility Provider by the Arbor Day Foundation.


The OAEC (Oklahoma Association of Electric Cooperatives) has a monthly publication (Oklahoma Living) that can be mailed to you or that is also available on-line at http://www. ok-living.coop. In order to prevent any unsolicited mailings, PEC will not provide your mailing address to them without your approval. If you would like to receive a copy of their publication on a monthly basis, please complete and sign the coupon below which lets us know that you would like your name added to their monthly mailing list. Return the coupon to PEC, P O Box 429, Ada, OK 74821- 0429.


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Return with your bill or mail to: PEC


P.O. Box 429 Ada, OK 74821-0429.


Through its Tree Line USA program, the Arbor Day Foundation, in coop- eration with the National Association of State Foresters, recognizes public and private utility providers that dem- onstrate practices that protect and enhance America’s urban forests.


The goal of Tree Line USA is to promote safe, reliable electric service and abundant, healthy trees throughout a utility’s service areas. 0351300900 These two goals may seem counter to each other, but evidence shows that well-placed vegetation is a needed partner in our attempts to become more energy efficient.


Although vegetation growing too close to power lines and electric distribution equipment causes 15 percent of power interruptions according to the National Rural Electric Cooperative Association (NRECA), the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) estimates a single tree can have the cooling effect of 10 room-sized air conditioners running 20 hours a day. “Trees are an important part of urban landscapes all across the United States from an environmental and economic standpoint,” says John Rosenow, chief executive and founder of the Arbor Day Foundation. “Trees not only help clean the air and water sources, the shade they provide helps reduce peak energy usage


Steve DeShazo


Director of Vegetation Management and Arborist


and conserve energy. Utility providers like PEC are setting a good example about the importance of recognizing and taking care of a valuable community resource like trees.” Led by Steve DeShazo, Director of Vegetation Management and Arborist, PEC met five requirements for a Tree Line USA utility. We follow industry standards for quality tree care, have annual employee training in best tree care practices, participate in and sponsor tree-planting and public education programs, have a tree-based energy conservation program and participate in Arbor Day celebrations.


In order to ensure dependable service, PEC is diligent in its vegetation management. PEC crews remove and prune trees near our power lines at no cost to our members.


It is recommended that no tree be planted any closer than 35 feet from the electric line. Most trees should not require trimming if this standard is observed. PEC is required to trim any vegetation back 15 feet from the line. This also requires us to trim 15 feet under the bottom conductor. When trees are trimmed that have been planted too close to, or under the electric lines, it is impossible to trim them to the 15 foot specification and keep them looking natural.


Planned Vegetation placement will go a long ways in keeping our energy cost manageable.


The Arbor Day Foundation is a nonprofi t conservation and education organization dedicated to tree planting and environmental stewardship. More information about the Foundation and the Tree Line USA program can be found at www.arborday.org.


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