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ElectraLite Operation Round Up making a differnce


Each year, the Operation Round Up program has an audit of the financial records of the CVEC Foundation. At the same time, the accountants conduct an independent review of the Foundation financial statements.


The primary benefit of a comprehensive annual audit is to assure CVEC members, the very people who donate to Operation Round Up and make grants possible, that financial statements are accurate and reliable. The audit verifies the numbers, ensures accuracy, and assesses procedures.


The external professionals who conduct the audit also strive to identify any possible weak- nesses in our internal controls and recommend ways to improve the integrity of our financial practices.


The money contributed to Operation Round Up is entrusted to the CVEC Foundation, Inc., board, which is made up of eight volunteers who each live in one of the eight districts making up the co-ops service area. The directors are appointed by CVEC Trustees to serve a three year term. They meet regularly throughout the year-every six to eight weeks-to care- fully review and decide funding requests.


Individuals and nonprofit agencies wishing to apply for assistance can download an appli- cation from CVEC’s website, www.canadianvalley.org or pick up at the CVEC headquarters. Forms can also be mailed upon request. If you have questions or need additional information, call Sheri Wyant at Canadian Valley.


CVEC Foundation, Inc. Board of Directors


Charles Annanders James Hargrove Connie Guinn Larry Spoonemore Frank Oliver Dian Dawson Shirley Boren Tom Mikles


FINANCIAL STATEMENT


BEGINNING BALANCE 12/31/11...$148,355.56 Deposits .......................................................7,461.26 Interest Income ................................................6.96 Checks Issued ........................................... -3,274.13 Approved, not yet paid ..........................-11,051.82 BALANCE 1/31/12.............................$141,497.83


Important information for


members dependent on life support Canadian Valley Electric continually updates its listing of


members who are dependent on dialysis machines, respira- tors, or other life support equipment that operates electrically in their homes. If you or someone living in your home uses such life saving devices, please complete the following infor- mation and return it to CVEC at the address below:


Name:_____________________________________________ Address:__________________________________________ Account No.________________ Phone No.____________ Type of Support Equipment: _______________________ Time of Use:______________ or Hours Per Day_______ Time Used During Day:_______________to ____________ Other Use: ___________________________________________ Can Equipment Be Manually Operated? Yes_____ No_____


Do you have a Back-up Electric Generator? Yes_____ No_____


CANADIAN VALLEY ELECTRIC COOPERATIVE


March 2012 Surge protection continued from page 1


Surge Protector Ratings On a listed surge protector, you should find a couple of ratings. Look for:


• Clamping voltage — This tells you what voltage will cause the MOVs to con- duct electricity to the ground line. A lower clamping voltage indicates better protec- tion. There are three levels of protection in the UL rating -- 330 V, 400 V and 500 V. Generally, a clamping voltage more than 400 V is too high.


• Energy absorption/dissipation — This rating, given in joules, tells you how much energy the surge protector can absorb before it fails. A higher number indicates greater protection. Look for a protector that is at least rated at 200 to 400 joules. For better protection, look for a rating of 600 joules or more.


• Response time — Surge protectors


don’t kick in immediately; there is a very slight delay as they respond to the power surge. A longer response time tells you that your computer (or other equipment) will be exposed to the surge for a greater amount of time. Look for a surge protector that responds in less than one nanosecond. You should also look for a protector with an indicator light that tells you if the protection components are functioning. All MOVs will burn out after repeated power surges, but the protector will still func- tion as a power strip. Without an indicator light, you have no way of knowing if your protector is still functioning properly. Better surge protectors may come with some sort of guarantee of their perfor- mance. If you’re shopping for more expen- sive units, look for a protector that comes with a guarantee on your computer. If the unit fails to protect your computer from a power surge, the company will actually replace your computer. This isn’t total insurance, of course — you’ll still lose all the data on your hard drive, which could cost you plenty — but it is a good indica- tion of the manufacturer’s confidence in their product. Surprisingly, surge protectors are an extremely controversial piece of technol- ogy, and they have sparked a great deal of debate. There are latterly thousands of pages of information on the web if you should want to know more.


This month two hidden account numbers


are hidden in The ElectraLite. Each is worth $25. The number must be your own and found within the the paper. Your number must be reported by the 15th of each month to our office by phone, mail or in person.


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