This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
ENERGY EFFICIENCY


Ready, Set, Grow! Landscaping can Improve Your Home’s Energy Efficiency


You’ve upgraded your ap- pliances, insulation, and light- ing to help lower your monthly electric bill. What else can you do? Plenty, if you have a yard with landscaping options. The right combination of plants and trees can unearth hidden en- ergy savings.


The U.S. Department of


Energy claims landscaping with energy efficiency in mind, on average, could save enough energy to recoup your invest- ment in less than eight years.


Simple Shading You might be protected


from the hot summer sun in your home, but your electric bill isn’t. Solar heat absorbed through windows and your roof causes your air conditioner to work harder.


Shading a home with trees


could drop the surrounding air temperature by as much as 9


degrees. It gets better closer to the ground — since cool air sinks down, the air under trees may be up to 25 degrees cooler than the air over the driveway. Different trees serve unique purposes. To block summer solar heat but let the winter sun through, use deciduous trees. Evergreens trees and shrubs are ideal to provide continuous shade and block heavy winds. Don’t forget about shrubs


and ground cover plants. These short but study shade-givers reduce heat radiation, cool- ing air before it reaches your home’s walls and windows. If you have an air conditioner, shading the unit can increase its efficiency by as much as 10 percent.


Shading takes time. For example, a 6-foot to 8-foot deciduous tree planted near a home will begin shading win- dows in a year. Depending on


New Co-op Connections Card Partners


Hines Bookkeeping & Tax Service, Inc., Collinsville New clients filing 1040-series returns - $50 (includes E-filing or paper filing of Federal & Oklahoma State Returns with or without direct deposit(s), schedule(s) A, B, C & D. Call 918-371-3824 for an appointment.


Main Street Martial Arts, Collinsville Two weeks free – Tae Kwon Do, Aiki Jutsu, and Lil Dragons – ages 3 to 7.


Call 918-688-9465. March 2012 VVEC Power Circuit 3


the species and the home, the tree will shade the roof in five to 10 years.


Windbreaks Shrubs and trees create


windbreaks — essentially walls to keep the wind chill away from a home. Why is that im- portant? Wind speed lowers outside air temperatures. A windbreak reduces wind speed nearby, saving your home from higher heating costs. It’s best to block wind with a combination of trees and shrubs with low crowns —foli- age which grows close to the ground. Evergreens are ideal, and when combined with a wall or fence these windbreaks can deflect or even lift wind over a home.


For the best protection, plan on leaving between two to five times the mature height of the trees or shrubs between the windbreak and the protected home.


Ready, Set, GROW! Remember, your landscap- ing plan depends on your climate and how your home is situated. Find out more about your climate, micro-climates, shading dos and don’ts, and windbreaks at www.energysav- ers.gov. To learn more ways to save energy around your home, visit www.TogetherWeSave. com.


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92  |  Page 93  |  Page 94  |  Page 95  |  Page 96  |  Page 97  |  Page 98  |  Page 99  |  Page 100  |  Page 101  |  Page 102  |  Page 103  |  Page 104  |  Page 105  |  Page 106  |  Page 107  |  Page 108  |  Page 109  |  Page 110  |  Page 111  |  Page 112  |  Page 113  |  Page 114  |  Page 115  |  Page 116  |  Page 117  |  Page 118  |  Page 119  |  Page 120  |  Page 121  |  Page 122  |  Page 123  |  Page 124  |  Page 125  |  Page 126  |  Page 127  |  Page 128  |  Page 129  |  Page 130  |  Page 131  |  Page 132  |  Page 133  |  Page 134  |  Page 135  |  Page 136  |  Page 137  |  Page 138