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MODERN CASTING .COM


LINKEDIN DISCUSSION Is Lost Foam Lost?


On the Foundry and Diecaster Network on LinkedIn, a member asked, “Why isn’t lost foam used more?” Below are excerpts of some of the discussion points:


“Lost foam suits a large number of appli- cations, but the high tooling cost deters the use of this technology.”—Ashwin Kalia, Chaparral Technologies Inc.


“Most lost foam casting failures were due to a lack of venture capital, foam molding and casting knowledge and the lack of ability from those of us in this industry to accurately and completely present this to new and existing cus- tomers.”—Ron Watkins, ACH Foam Technologies


“We found that the process is a bit diffi cult to control.”—Dave Moyer, Advanced Cast Products


Editor’s Note: MODERN CASTING does not necessarily endorse the views expressed in the LinkedIn discussion.


Visit moderncasting.com for a link to the Foundry and Diecaster Network.


POLL QUESTION The November website question asked:


Do you heat treat your castings in-house or contract it out?


65.6% 21.9% IN-HOUSE


This month’s question is available at www.moderncasting.com.


CONNECT WITH US


Like: American Foundry Society Follow:


@AmerFoundrySoc


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Join: Foundry and Diecaster Network


CONTRACT IT OUT


12.5% BOTH BLOG ROLL Recognizing Casting’s Passion


Manufacturing is seeing a sense of revival in the mainstream media and pop culture. From television shows to consumer


advertising for automobiles (Toyota) and golf clubs (Ping), a a love for manufacturing is resurging.


Another example recently surfaced with Sailor Jerry Spiced Rum, which produced a series of digital short vid- eos called Hold Fast in which it profi les “craftsmen of different stripes.” One of the profi les centers on Paige Tooker, owner of New York Art Foundry. This copper-based investment casting shop is one of only a handful of metalcast- ers in New York City. The Hold Fast videos made their debut on Nov. 21.


Foundry Reopening a Sign of Optimism


Maritime Steel and Foundries Ltd., New Glasgow, Nova Scotia, Canada, sat idle for almost 11 months before its furnaces fi red up again in Novem- ber. New owner Abbas Jafarnia, who worked as quality control manager for the steel casting company, is no stranger to the work, and he’s optimistic about the fi rm’s ability to turn a profi t, according to an article in The Chronicle Herald.


Unsurprisingly, Jafarnia said he faced some resistance from New Glasgow to reopen the downtown facility, which is a familiar challenge to other companies in the industry.


Visit moderncasting.com to read the full blogs and additional entries.


January 2012 MODERN CASTING | 3


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