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DECEMBER 2011  PLAY IT SAFE


Christmas horseplay can have serious consequences Make sure kids are supervised to head off an unforeseen holiday disaster


BY GUY DALE coordinator of safety & loss control


A


mid the cooking and the cleaning and the Christimastime company, don’t neglect your most- important holiday blessing: your


kids. To keep holidays calm and accident free, try to sit them down and talk about staying safe around hot stoves, flickering fireplaces, and electric lights and decorations.


For all the fun that comes with the holidays, there’s another side to the story: The U.S. Fire Administration reports that deaths from fires caused by children increase during the winter, and twice as many kids die or are injured by fires during the holidays than at any other time of the year.


We’d like to help you avoid a holiday disaster by reminding you of some basic but important safety information:


 Electrical accidents involving kids are far more likely to happen when no adult is supervising the kids.


 Keep children away from cords and decorations. Try to avoid decorating the bottom limbs of the tree, where toddlers can easily reach.


 Never leave kids alone with a lighted fireplace, candles or space heater.


 If you leave the kitchen, turn off the stove, even if you’re not finished cooking. Move hot pots to back burners.


 Teach your kids that hot things can burn them. When they’re old enough, teach them how to use the stove safely.


 Choose battery-powered toys instead of electric versions for kids younger than 10.


 Buy electrical toys only if they carry a safety label from UL or another testing agency.


 If you take your kids to visit someone, do a visual sweep of the home for potential hazards such as exposed electrical outlets or lighted candles.


To visit with Guy Dale about safety issues, please call 800-760-6486, ext. 227.


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CEC


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