This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
showcasing the best professionals and amateurs from around the world. All play for a green jacket and lifetime use of the tiny but coveted Champions Locker Room. In many ways, time


slows down at Augusta. Fans are called patrons; no running is permitted; cell phone use results in loss of a badge—media included; everything, from sandwich wrappers and cups, to con- cession stands and garbage bags, is green; viewing chairs can be left unattend- ed around the greens, with no worry of being moved or stolen; and perhaps best of all, prices for tickets, food and merchandise are very reasonable. The Masters features


No. 13 Augusta National


off easy compared to an NFL, NBA, NHL or MLB game.


Did I mention parking


is free? Sure, you must ar- rive early and traffi c jams on Washington Road, a busy street outside the club that is fl anked by strip malls


and most are elevated. Try as it may, television doesn’t do them justice. You honestly don’t get a true sense of how steep they are until you see them in person. For writers, the state- of-the-art media center


the unoffi cial gathering place for members, agents, golf course architects and VIPs, and is a good spot to interview players. A lot of big deals are brokered under that tree, the same area where Fuzzy Zoeller made his ill-advised comments


eight kinds of sandwiches— turkey, tuna salad, chicken breast, barbecue (hot), club sandwich, egg salad, ham and cheese and of course, the patron-favorite, Pimento Cheese. Prices range from $1.50 to $2.50. Add a soft drink ($1.50), a beer ($2.75) ice cream ($2.50) or a fruit snack ($1), and you get


and fast food restaurants on both sides, can be brutal. But if you do your home- work, stake out a prime viewing spot, and come prepared—thunderstorms are not uncommon—it’s arguably the best sporting venue in the world. The rolling prop-


erty is enormous and resembles an immacu- late park-like setting. The greens are huge and undulating


is unsurpassed. More like a high-tech theater that ascends from front to back, it has high-speed wireless Internet access, television monitors, up- to-the-minute scores, stats and quotes, headphones for player interviews and good food. In short, you can do your job without leaving the building. Most writers spend a


good deal of time under “The Big Oak Tree’’ located on the golf course side of the clubhouse. Planted in the 1850s, the tree is


about Woods in 1997. The U.S. Open is an- other animal. In fact, some would call it a beast. Hosted by the United States Golf Association, the tournament rotates among a group of heralded courses and is a four-day mental and physi- cal grind. More often than not, par is golden. This year, the USGA issued 950 media creden- tials to writers and pho- tographers representing 45 countries for the 111th championship at Congres- sional Country Club near


SUMMER 2011 / NCGA.ORG / 35


PHOTO: DREAMS TI ME


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76