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Voluntary cities


Fig. 34: Emerging practices from voluntary cities in climate change governance Burlington


Edina


Highest level of responsibility for climate change


Incentives for management of climate change issues


Team-based approach


No


Chief executive of the city


No Kaohsiung


Chief executive of the city


No


Las Vegas


Chief executive of the city


No


Taipei


Chief executive of the city


All employees are entitled to non-monetary recognition


modes (e.g. bicycle over car) and introducing alternative fuel fleets (e.g. hybrid cars and buses). However, few voluntary cities have a grasp of the financial impact or GHG reduction potential of measures. Having an understanding of the GHG reduction potential alongside cost can enable cities to identify the GHG reduction efforts with maximum returns.


Community emissions inventories vary across voluntary cities 3 voluntary cities measure and disclose community related emissions. Comparable to C40 cities, emissions data collection and management are conducted in different ways across different cities. Kaohsiung City, for example, makes use of IPCC guidelines for their emissions, subdivided into different categories, while Burlington uses the ICLEI methodology together with the Clean Air and Climate Protection software tool.


As with C40 cities, an important methodological area of concordance between cities is the boundary definition for community emissions profile. Every city that reported its community emissions identified the “geopolitical area” of the city as its boundary. None of the voluntary cities report emissions by scope. None have their community emissions verified by a third party.


Across both C40 and voluntary cities, the physical risks of climate change have captured the attention of city governments 5 voluntary cities state that current and/or anticipated effects climate change present significant physical risks to their city. 5 cities have taken steps to identify these risks through risk assessments. Drought and heat topped the list, with 4 cities reporting risks due to warming temperatures.


“The city is currently reviewing new software tools that will facilitate data integration, information sharing across different departments and communication of GHG emission data to the City Council and residents.”


Edina


“Ever since 2008, we have appropriated budget for energy saving and carbon reduction projects, and for the expenses of increasing or replacing energy saving equipment in government agencies & schools.”


Taipei 33 © 2011 Carbon Disclosure Project


“The City of Las Vegas contracted with a software provider to deliver an energy management solution to track energy consumption across the organization. This software program provides a centrally and securely managed repository of all (GHG) emissions, environmental and energy activities and associated emissions for reporting and real-time view of progress.”


Las Vegas


“The City of Burlington has conducted a cost- carbon-benefit analysis to highlight the top strategies of a list of 200 generated through an intensive stakeholder engagement process.”


Burlington


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