This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
CDP Cities 2011


“Copenhagen has an ambition of becoming the world’s first carbon neutral capital and the city has a goal of using this as a catalyst for ‘Green Growth’, focusing on green energy, green transportation and green construction.”


Copenhagen


“The Mayor wants London to be a leading low carbon capital and maximise the economic opportunities from this low carbon transition. London already has strengths in areas such as carbon markets, financing, legal services, and research and development.”


London Fig. 31: Cities that have a plan for increasing city’s resilience to climate change, by region 26 out of 42


62 100%% 3 out of 3


Total Africa ....% Number of regional percentage


Fig. 32: Positive physical effects of climate change identified by cities (% of respondents)


24% 0 25 Change in rainfall amount or patterns


Longer growing season / New agricultural products Fewer or less extreme freezes


30 Number of responding cities (24) © 2011 Carbon Disclosure Project 22% 50 21% 3% 75


Carbon fertilization effect Other


- Temperature increase - Tourism


- Energy efficiency - Cooperation


30% 100


100% 70% 7 out of 10


North


East Asia 5 out of 5


America 60%


Southeast Asia and Oceania


3 out of 5 50%


South and West Asia


1 out of 2 44% Europe 4 out of 9 38% Latin America 3 out of 8


Most cities have a plan for increasing their resilience 26 cities have plans to protect infrastructure, business sectors, and citizens against extreme weather events for increasing resilience to the expected impacts of climate change. Between regions and cities, large differences exist:


• In Japan, Tokyo and Yokohama have formulated local disaster management plans


• In North America, most cities have a dedicated Office of Emergency Management


• In Europe, 50 percent of the European cities indicate that they have an adaptation plan


• In Latin America, cities (excluding Brazil) are in the process of initiating actions plans


A small but significant number of cities identified opportunities for their cities stemming from climate change At present cities seem to be more focused on capturing risks rather than identifying the potential opportunities.


However, 24 cities state that they expect to see some positive effects of climate change. Cities highlight how growing interest in climate change by stakeholders has helped obtain new levels of funding (Los Angeles), has expedited the implementation of a drainage master plan (São Paulo), or has created incentives to collaborate with business on energy efficiency.


Jakarta, for instance, anticipates benefits from increased rainfall, through the provision of greater amounts of clean water, which can be used to extend green areas.


Some C40 cities are capitalizing on the opportunity


In the corporate sector a number of companies see climate change as an opportunity for innovation and a pathway for competitive advantage. This trend has not gone unnoticed by C40 cities. 6 cities (Seoul, London, Copenhagen, Tokyo, Yokohama, Rio de Janeiro) see climate change management as an opportunity for economic growth and as a key area for differentiation, improved competitiveness and a timely opportunity to kick start a green economy.


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40