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38 RTINNOVATIONS


INSTANT LABEL


PRINTER LAUNCHED New TH2 label printer has been pre- programmed specifi cally for the retail sector to offer portable, intelligent printing


The TH2 label printer from SATO is targeting the retail environment. Its manufacturer said no training is needed due to its intuitive functions, which allow users to immediately produce labels for 10 popular label formats including: price, VAT change, reduced, sale, ‘was/now’ and barcodes. Many retail outlets currently handle price markdowns using


pre-printed labels, which can be infl exible and result in non- uniform price reduction information being communicated to customers and staff implementing markdowns inaccurately. The TH2 already comes equipped to handle price markdown functionality using an optional handheld scanner. Brian Lang, SATO International European managing director,


said: “For those working in the ultra-competitive retail sector the TH2 represents a real problem-solving solution and can save retailers time and money with its pre-programmed functionality. Not only is the price very attractive but the ease of use and ability to begin creating label formats straightaway can give retailers a real fl exibility of response while maintaining total control of their pricing.” www.satoeurope.com/uk


RADIO TECHNOLOGY COULD


SAVE RETAILERS MILLIONS A groundbreaking radio-tagging system has won its creators a leading engineering entrepreneurship award worth £40,000


Sithamparanathan Sabesan and Dr Michael Crisp [pictured], both from Cambridge University’s engineering department, scooped the Royal Academy of Engineering ERA Foundation Entrepreneurship Award for their research into a low-cost location sensing system, which could have major benefi ts for a wide range of businesses. The Real Time Location System (RTLS) will allow businesses such as High Street retailers and airline baggage and goods tagging systems, to cheaply and effectively monitor the location of these items to within one metre. Current systems only allow for around 60% of tagged items to be detected and are also not able to locate tags accurately in real time, while the new system could be 100% accurate. Retail groups have also been engaged in the project, not just


for tagging items but also for the advancement of self-service checkouts.


The pair will accept their award at a ceremony in London’s Guildhall on 6 June, which includes a £10,000 personal prize, and a further £30,000 to invest in developing their winning idea. www.raeng.org.uk


NEW APPLE APP AIMS AT SMALLER RETAILERS New iPhone and iPad application is aiming to empower smaller and independent retailers to cash in on the m-commerce revolution


Min-i-Mags’ ‘Appalogue’ is an electronic catalogue app for smartphones designed to create a virtual marketplace allowing around- the-clock promotion for merchants and an intuitive browsing experience for consumers. Jillian Manly, who created the Min-i- Mags app with Kern Wyman, said: “Limited advertising budgets and a highly competitive retail environment make it diffi cult for smaller merchants to be found. Electronic shopping


RETAIL TECHNOLOGY MARCH/APRIL 2011


provides a brighter future for independent retailers as it allows them to compete by providing greater convenience.” The fi rst product from Min-i-Mags’ Appalogue range is “myAPP4KIDS,” which provides a marketplace environment for baby and children products including clothing, accessories, toys and entertainment. Wyman added: “What we do is identify key, large and growing markets where there


are gaps in customer service and diffi culties for merchants to gain exposure. We then create a user friendly app-based marketplace to connect merchants with the consumers that are already interested in their products.” The business is also working on extending


the Appalogue range across a number of important retail sectors while increasing compatibility with additional platforms. www.mm4mp.com


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