This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
Patricia Ann McNair


ERE YOU ARE, exploring the neighborhoods of downtown Providence, Rhode Island, marveling at the variety of architectural styles that tell of the city’s history—from the colonial buildings of the College Hill area to the contemporary edifices of the city’s center. You climb the steeply rising streets from Downcity beside the river to reach the higher eleva- tions of Thayer and Benefit Streets. This is not always an easy city to navigate with its bending streets that change names without warning. Still, finding your way around is part of the fun of travel. You walk until you are footsore and thirsty, until you are hungry enough to eat a—what? What do they eat in Providence, you wonder. What are some of the specialties not to be missed?


“Rhode Island is a food lover’s paradise,” a local citizen tells you. You meet him when you stop in a coffee- house near Brown University and the Rhode Island School of Design (RISD, pronounced “Rizzdee”). RISD was established in the 1870s and is considered one of the most important art and design colleges in the country. The RISD Museum of Art is a world- class museum, with a permanent collection of more than 84,000 objects and exhibits in a variety of media that


44


showcase art from all over the world: paintings, sculpture, textiles, and so on. You will spend some time there, perhaps several hours, but ultimately you will need some sustenance. You might opt for a coffee milk. Named the official state drink of Rhode Island in legislation passed in 1993, this sweet, cold, and tasty concoction was introduced to Rhode Island in the 1930s. Some people think that it might be a variation of an Italian drink, adapted and served by members of Rhode Island’s significant Italian population. The recipe is simple—cold milk with a good lacing of coffee syrup that was originally homemade from sugar and coffee grounds but is now mass produced and sold under the brand names of Autocrat and Eclipse.


A variation on a coffee milk is a


coffee cabinet (or coffee cab), which hits the spot on a hot day. Just add coffee ice cream to the coffee milk recipe and blend. Why is it called a coffee cabinet? Perhaps because the first person to serve it had to get his blender out of the cabinet in order to make it. And by the way, this is not to be confused with what is called a milk shake here. In Providence, a milk shake is just that: flavoring added to milk that’s shaken.


PHOTO: ERIK GOULD/COURTESY OF THE MUSEUM OF ART RHODE ISLAND SCHOOL OF DESIGN


A P R I L 2 0 1 1


The RISD Museum of Art, between Main and Benefit Streets on the historic East Side of Providence, houses a collection of 84,000 items and serves as an icon in the redevelopment of the city.


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66