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VISTA COVER STORY THE CITY OF MAGICAL MURALS


Early Visionaries Establ ished an Element of Publ ic Art Written by Heather Petrek / Photos by Heather Fuqua


Prehistoric times as far back as 30,000BCidentify cavemen


as the first designers ofmurals.Civilizations of ancientEgypt, Greece andRome followed suit, creatingwall paintings in tombs, palaces, temples and domestic houses.Throughout his- tory, people have used clay, hematite, limestone and paint to depict aspects of their lives on thewalls that surrounded them. In themore recent early 1990s, aVistawoman named Jacque-


lineKoop had a vision that involvedmurals portrayed in such a way theywould cause growth and beautification in the town. “In a dream, I sawa vision of a tour bus behind John Shakar- ian’s Jewelry Store,where peoplewere coming to visitVisa to see a city ofmurals.Therewasn’t even a parking lot therewhen I sawthis,” saysKoop. Amember of the board of


theVistaVillageBusiness Association and chairperson of the city’s design commit- tee,Koop beganworking with John Shakarian, then the committee’s vice presi- dent, tomake this vision a reality. Koop asked city hall for


funding.Therewasmuch concern about graffiti at that time, butKoop knewthat graffiti artists typically tag only blank “canvasses,” and a paintedmuralwould be re- spected, not destroyed. “Itwas a tough sell,”Koop


Clayton Parker, a local artist, painted the longest hand-painted, continu- ous mural in the world in Vista.


recalls, “butwe got some funding for that first littlemural – a fire engine fromyesteryear,VistaFireDepartment 1929,


Continued on Page 51 VISTA VIEW NORTH ADOBE LIFE


VISTACADO PARADE 8 VISTA MAGAZINE


KITES www.vistachamber.org


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