search.noResults

search.searching

dataCollection.invalidEmail
note.createNoteMessage

search.noResults

search.searching

orderForm.title

orderForm.productCode
orderForm.description
orderForm.quantity
orderForm.itemPrice
orderForm.price
orderForm.totalPrice
orderForm.deliveryDetails.billingAddress
orderForm.deliveryDetails.deliveryAddress
orderForm.noItems
RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT


‘Industries that are hesitant to switch technologies are having to do that more urgently then they thought’


g


investment has actually grown slightly.’ Quantum technology, for example, has seen investment go up, although as Wasley said, this could also be because ‘possibly investors have a higher-risk appetite.’ One way in which R&D has been aided


is via the Innovate UK drive to rebuild the economy through its sustainable innovation fund. Tis aims to rebuild from the damage caused by Covid-19 through investment in innovation. ‘Te prominent message that is coming out is about building the green economy,’ said Wasley. ‘On a practical level there has been around £200m worth of funding specifically for R&D for either tackling the effects of covid or mitigating the economic damage of it.’ Te funding has also been used to help


combat the issue of labour shortage due to the pandemic. Tis is where imaging and machine vision technology has come into its own, Wasley explained. ‘With fruit picking, for example, people can’t come across and pick fruit as usual, so we are funding robotics, but also vision technologies.’ Te fruit picking work in which KTN


in involved is part of a large UK agri- food consortium that was formed to address agricultural labour shortages by accelerating the use of robotics and automation for picking and packing fresh


Fieldwork Robotics has completed field trials with some of the largest soft fruit growers in the UK


fruit and vegetables. Te effort is being co-ordinated alongside the University of Lincoln, the National Farmers Union (NFU), Agri-EPI Centre, and the Manufacturing Technology Centre, with the backing of more than 100 of the UK’s fresh food producers.


Easing growing pains Te consortium has trialled several new robot-based systems on farms producing strawberries, apples, blueberries, lettuce and broccoli. Tose approved technologies will then be manufactured at scale and


fully implemented for the 2021 growing season. Simon Pearson, professor of agri-


food technology at the University of Lincoln, said: ‘Around 70,000 workers are needed annually to pick and pack these products. Due to Covid-19 restrictions, it is estimated that only 30 per cent of migrant agricultural workers are expected to come to the UK this season [2020], with uncertainty continuing in the future. Tis could cause severe problems for numerous market sectors, such as fruit and vegetable picking, which, ultimately, will reduce the


“Anything is Possible with a Single Sensor”


 Easily Customizable Lighting Conditions  Manage & Modify Lighting Conditions Remotely


Surf.Finder Free-Illumination Multiple Defects


Surface Property Imaging (All Acquired at Once) Contamination


Scratch Dent  Includes Various Image Processing Algorithms (eg. Photometric Stereo)  Robust Against Any Type of Surface


DEEDIIM Sensors


 Quantitatively Measures Surface Properties  Can Detect Multiple & Complex Surface Defects


Conventional Image www.deediim.com


Reflectivity


Roughness Free Sample Testing


Inclination Rental Available


Fieldwork Robotics


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44