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healthy kids Banishing


Body-Image Blues How Teens Can Learn to Love Their Looks


by Amber Lanier Nagle M


Let Master Stylist Nicole Nemeth bring out your natural beauty!


for any haircut ($25 value)


50% OFF


during the month


of February! New Clients Only


Also specializing in Hair Extensions, Hair Color,


European Highlight Technique, Keratin treatments and


Yuko Japanese Straightening


Stella Luca Salon 460 North Orlando Avenue, Winter Park Village


407-234-5527 26


(rated #1 Salon by OBJournal) Central Florida


any young women don’t feel comfortable in their own skin. A 21st-century global study


sponsored by Unilever’s Dove brand found that 90 percent of girls from 15 to 17 years old wanted to change at least one aspect of their physical appearance, especially their body weight. University of Minnesota research following adolescents for 10 years showed that about half of the female participants had dieted in the previous year, twice the number of males. Tracy Anderson, a mother of two and


fitness expert, has spent the last 18 years working with women seeking balance in their bodies. In her recent book, Total Teen: Tracy Anderson’s Guide to Health, Happiness, and Ruling Your World, she observes, “Teens are depleted from comparing themselves to the shapes of others and from scolding themselves: ‘I should be thinner, I should be able to fit in those pants, I should be in better shape.’ But looking good on the outside must start with feeling good on the inside.”


Monitor Toughts


Anderson believes we feel most happy and fulfilled and accomplish the most when our minds are calm, clear and alert. “If young women learn to connect with their mind, identify when their thoughts are anxious or stressed, and practice conscious breathing and meditating to regain a calm, centered state, they’ll be able to rebalance themselves for the rest of their lives,” she says. “By keeping a thought journal for a while and noticing when their thoughts have negative undertones, they can retrain their attitude.”


Live a complaint-free day once each week. Every time a negative thought pops up, expel it and focus on a positive aspect of the idea or experience. Also invest a few moments each day feeling thankful for successful aspects of life. “After a while, these exercises become habitual,” says Anderson. “Happy,


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