search.noResults

search.searching

saml.title
dataCollection.invalidEmail
note.createNoteMessage

search.noResults

search.searching

orderForm.title

orderForm.productCode
orderForm.description
orderForm.quantity
orderForm.itemPrice
orderForm.price
orderForm.totalPrice
orderForm.deliveryDetails.billingAddress
orderForm.deliveryDetails.deliveryAddress
orderForm.noItems
Taylor Walton


Prepare for an influx of flexible working requests


As the latest lockdown comes to an end, employees who have grown used to working from home may have mixed feelings about returning to the workplace, especially if it means a long commute to and from the offi ce. With this in mind, businesses have already received an infl ux of


fl exible working requests, which will have to be handled appropriately in accordance with the legal requirements. Only employees with at least 26 weeks of continuous employment


can put forward fl exible working requests, meaning consultants and contractors would not be eligible. T erefore, employers must carefully consider requests, taking the time to understand the individual reasons and what impact it would have on productivity. During these meetings, employees should be allowed to have another colleague accompanying them and should have the details of an appeals process explained to them, so they know what to do if they are unhappy with the outcome.


Alec Colson Head of


Employment Law Taylor Walton


What to expect and important considerations T e request must be in writing and an employee can only make one in any 12-month period. Typically the individual will be seeking one of the following: - Change their place of work – e.g., work from home for some or all of their hours - Squeeze their total working hours into fewer days - Reduce their full-time role to part-time - Flexible working day start and end times


Once a request has been received, it is up to the employer to deliver an answer within three months, including any time needed to submit an appeal. T is time can be extended by mutual agreement, which may be benefi cial for both parties in certain situations. After the meeting, it is important to weigh up the


pros and cons of accepting the request, leaving no stone unturned in terms of what impact long-term fl exible working would have on colleagues. Most flexible working requests come from individuals that are looking for a better work-life


26


ALL THINGS BUSINESS


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56