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18 CRAFTBUTCHER l MAY 2019


MEMBERS ADVICE


REVIEW YOUR ALLERGEN CONTROLS A REMINDER OF THE 14 ALLERGENS


Tere are 14 major allergens which need to be declared when used as ingredients. Te following list tells you what these allergens are and provides some examples of foods where they may be found:


CELERY Tis includes celery stalks, leaves and seeds and celeriac. It is oſten found in celery salt, salads, some meat products, soups and stock cubes.


RICHARD STEVENSON, TECHNICAL MANAGER Delivering advice to Members


I only reported on the


control of allergen cross contamination last November. However, given the current focus on this issue it is important to review the advice given then and also include new information and developments. Te number of people with


allergies is still increasing. 2% of adults and a worrying 8% of children now suffer from one form or another. Around one person a month dies from an anaphylactic shock. In addition, 1,500 die from asthma attack. Tis is also on the increase and it is thought that many of the attacks were triggered by an allergy. It is vital that any food


or ingredient containing allergens does not accidently contaminate other allergen- free foods.


ANOTHER RECENT CASE Megan Lee aged 15 died


from a reaction to peanuts in a take-away Indian meal. Megan and a friend had ordered online through Just Eat and the food was supplied by 'Royal Spice' in her home town of Oswaldtwistle. Megan had told the take-


away that she was allergic to peanuts and she was assured that there were none in the dishes she chose. However, traces of peanut


were later found in three of the dishes eaten. Investigations revealed that there were no controls or measures taken by


EGGS Oſten found in cakes, some meat products, mayonnaise, mousses, pasta, quiche, sauces and foods brushed or glazed with Allergen information for loose foods.


FISH Found in some fish sauces, pizzas, relishes, salad dressings, stock cubes and in Worcestershire sauce.


LUPIN Tis includes lupin seeds and flour, and can be found in some types of bread, pastries and pasta.


MILK Tis is found in butter, cheese, cream, milk powders and yoghurt. It is oſten used in foods glazed with milk, powdered soups and sauces.


MOLLUSCS Tis includes mussels, land snails, squid and whelks. Oſten found in oyster sauce or as an ingredient in fish stews.


MUSTARD Tis includes liquid mustard, mustard powder and mustard seeds. It is oſten found in breads, curries, marinades, meat products, salad dressing, sauces and soups.


NUTS Tis includes almonds, hazelnuts, walnuts, cashews, pecan nuts, Brazil nuts, pistachio nuts, macadamia or Queensland nuts. Tese can be found in breads, biscuits, crackers, desserts, ice cream, marzipan (almond paste), nut oils and sauces. Ground crushed or flaked almonds are oſten used in Asian dishes such as curries or stir fries.


PEANUTS Tis can be found in biscuits, cakes, curries, desserts and sauces such as satay. It is also found in groundnut oil and peanut flour.


SESAME SEEDS Found in bread, breadsticks, houmous, sesame oil and tahini (sesame paste).


SOYA Tis can be found in bean curd, edamame beans, miso paste, textured soya protein, soya flour or tofu. It is oſten used in some desserts, ice cream, meat products, sauces and vegetarian products


SULPHUR DIOXIDE Tis is oſten used as a preservative in dried fruit, meat products, soſt drinks and vegetables as well as in wine and beer.


CEREALS CONTAINING GLUTEN Tis includes wheat (such as spelt and Khorasan wheat/Kamut), rye, barley and oats. It is oſten found in foods containing flour, such as some baking powders, batter, breadcrumbs, bread, cakes, couscous, meat products, pasta, pastry, sauces, soups and foods dusted with flour. Te cereal will need to be declared. However, it is up to you if you want to declare the presence of gluten with this.


CRUSTACEANS Crabs, lobster, prawns and scampi. It is oſten found in shrimp paste used in Tai curries or salads.


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