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significantly enhancing the physical appearance of the finished mix. United Molasses GB Ltd 48 Gracechurch Street London EC3V 0EJ


Tel +44 (0)151 955 4850 Fax +44 (0) 151 955 4860 E-mail: molassesgb@umgroup.com www.unitedmolasses.com


VOLAC WILMAR FEED INGREDIENTS


from Volac and VWFI. Key products within the range include the established novel high-


C16 products developed specifically by VWFI called Mega-Fat 88 and Mega-Fat Extra. Mega-Fat 88 contains a high (88%) concentration of the active C16


raw material known to increase milk fat %. The minimal proportion of the lower melting point (‘softer’) fatty acids in the formulation, produce a highly rumen-bypass product which can help improve quality of compound feeds compared to other typical high-C16 products. Mega-Fat Extra is a further extension of the high-C16 range,


containing a very high concentration (97%) of C16 to deliver the maximum proportion of the active fatty acid to stimulate milk fat production and improved quality of high fat concentrate pellets. Mega-Energy is an energy supplement with both C16 to increase milk fat and C18:0 as an energy source. For monogastrics, VWFI have introduced Mega-One, a solid


fat source of digestible triglycerides providing energy, together with lecithin to promote better fat digestibility. High melting point fatty acids improve meat quality.


Volac Wilmar Feed Ingredients (VWFI), a joint venture between Volac and Wilmar International Ltd, has introduced an extended range of feed fat supplements to complement the world-leading Megalac brand. Megalac is a rumen-protected fat widely-proven to improve milk


yield and cow fertility. Manufactured for over 30 years, Megalac has a global presence and is the key brand in the ‘Mega’ range of feed fats


Volac Wilmar Feed Ingredients Limited, 50 Fishers Lane, Orwell, Royston, Hertfordshire, SG8 5XQ. E: enquiries@volacwilmar.com T: 01223 208021 www.volacwilmar.com


FATS FOR RUMINANTS By Dr Richard Kirkland, Volac Wilmar ruminant nutritionist


Fat in diets Fat is an essential component of balanced diets and is often added to increase energy density – crucially without increasing the acid load in the rumen. However, fats are not simply energy sources and individual fatty acids have different metabolic functions which help determine the effect they may have on animal production. Traditional forage/concentrate-based diets typically have a low fat


concentration (around 3% of diet DM) and increasing diet fat above this level with vegetable or fish oils, or other high fat ingredients, can lead to problems in the rumen, including: 1. Formation of an oil ‘slick’ preventing rumen bacteria from digesting fibre.


2. 3.


Fatty acid toxicity to strains of rumen bacteria. Formation of milk fat-depressing trans fatty acids.


4. Binding of minerals, reducing availability for bacterial growth and rumen function.


PAGE 52 MARCH/APRIL 2017 FEED COMPOUNDER These issues can be reduced by use of rumen-protected (rumen-


inert) fats which pass through the rumen intact with the fat released for digestion when it passes to the small intestine.


Fat supplements There is a plethora of rumen-protected fat supplements on the market targeted to ruminant animals and in particular, dairy cows. A summary of the primary product types is presented in Table 1.


Table 1: Common fat supplement types Fat type


Calcium salt High-C16


Hydrogenated Triglyceride-based


Method of rumen protection


Insoluble in rumen High melting point


Main fatty acids (typical)


C16:0, C18:1


Typically > 80% C16:0 C16:0, C18:0 C16:0


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