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Figure 2: Changes of pH of the rumen during postfeeding hours for control and treatment groups


6.7


also does not negatively affect soil quality or water quality, so drinking and irrigation effects will also be avoided (Berg et al., 2010).


6.6 6.5


Control MgO-A MgO-B MgO-C


6.4


Conclusion Timab Magnesium will continue to provide information and technical support to the feed market, and will be working on the production and supply of specialty products to help to keep operational costs down for feed production.


6.3 References 6.2 6.1 0 2 4 Time Postfeeding (h) Also, magnesium oxide is believed to aid in the mammary uptake


of acetate and other fat precursors from the blood, helping towards milk quality.


A new solution coming to meet changing demand on our dairy Herds The dairy industry is constantly evolving, with many outside variables affecting performance of dairy herds. Since 1995 the national dairy herd has decreased substantially, from 2.6 million heads to 1.9 million heads in 2016 (provisional), however the yearly volume of milk produced nationally has increased by 4% within this same period. This increase in total milk production, comes from an increasing strain on dairy cows to produce a higher volume of milk. The milk yield, per cow per year, has drastically increased since 1995, from 5500l up to 7900l in 2016 (provisional, AHDB), which is an increase of 44%. To cater for this increased demand in milk yield, farming practices and feeding regimes have also had to evolve and change during this time, and buffer feeding has become more commonplace on the farm. The increase in demand of buffer feeding has brought new strains and difficulties to the feed production industry, as new formulations have had to be drawn up, often resulting in higher logistical and operational costs which directly impacts on margin. This is another area of feed production Timab Magnesium would like to address, and offer a solution to help our clients continue to service the dairy industry amidst the high demands on milk production. By designing a specific formulation, we will be able to decrease operational costs for our customers by reducing volume throughput on site, thus saving on production costs and increasing margin potential. TIMAB Magnesium are devoted to developing a specific product,


with a formula based upon the best performing magnesium compounds in acidosis treatment, produced by our own production sites. By formulating a unique combination of compounds, physical structures and surface areas, this product would have a fast-acting and slow release function, providing a longer term rumen buffer than many conventional buffers in today’s market. Diet supplementation with this product would not affect the DCAD, as magnesium does not elicit important biological effects on the anion/cation balance. Magnesium


6 8


Bannink, A., Valk, H., Van Vuuren, A.M., 1999. Intake and excretion of sodium, potassium, and nitrogen and the effects on urine production by lactating dairy cows. J. Dairy Sci. 82, 1008–1018. Berg, J., Price, P., Westcot, D., Meyer, D., 2010. The industry wide salt study for existing milk cow dairies. Report prepared by the UC Davis Dairy Science Dept for Central Valley Regional Water Quality Control Board Order No. R5-2007-0035. Waste Discharge Requirements General Order For Existing Milk Cow Dairies. Central Valley Regional Water Quality Control Board, Sacramento, CA, USA. Chalupa, W., and P.L. Schneider. 1985. Buffers for dairy cattle. In Proc. Pacific NW Nutr. Conf., Boise, Idaho. Herod, E.L., R.M. Bechtle, E.E. Bartley, and A.D. Dayton. 1978. Buffering ability of several compounds in vitro and the effect of a selected buffer combination on ruminal acid production in vivo. J. Dairy Sci. 61: 1114-1122. Hu, W., Murphy, M.R., 2004. Dietary cation–anion difference effects on performance and acid–base status of lactating dairy cows: a meta- analysis. J. Dairy Sci. 87, 2222–2229. Hu, W., Murphy, M.R., 2005. Statistical evaluation of early- and mid- lactation dairy cow responses to dietary sodium bicarbonate addition. Anim. Feed Sci. Technol. 119, 43–54. Mengel, K., Kirkby, E.A., 2001. Further elements of importance. In: Principles of Plant Nutrition, 5th ed. Kluwer Academic Publication, Dordrecht, The Netherlands. Meschy, F., D. Bravo, and D. Sauvant. 2004. Méta-analyse des réponses de la vache laitière à la supplémentation en substances tampons. INRA Prod. Anim. 17:11–18. Plaizier JC, Krause DO, Gozho GN, Mc Bride BW 2008 .Subacute ruminal acidosis in dairy cows: the physiological causes, incidence and consequences. Vet J. 2008. Rauch R.E., Robinson P.H., Erasmus L.J. 2012. Effects of sodium bicarbonate and calcium magnesium carbonate supplementation on performance of high producing dairy cows. Animal Feed Science and Technology 177 (2012) 180– 193. WEST J. W., COPPOCK C. E., NAVE D, H., LABORE J. M, and GREENE L. W. 1987. Effects of Potassium Carbonate and Sodium Bicarbonate on Rumen Function in Lactating Holstein Cows. Journal of Dairy Science Vol. 70, No. 1, 1987 Van Soest, P. J. 1994. Fiber. Pages 140–155 in Nutritional Ecology of the Ruminant. 2nd ed. Comstock Publishing Associates, London, UK.


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Rumen pH


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