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This clearly presents analysts with an obvious problem in that the


data for months prior to August 2015 will not be directly comparable with data from subsequent months. There are, in passing, other peculiarities about the data for integrated poultry feed production in that the only data on raw materials used covers wheat, barley, maize and other grains; there is no reference to protein-bearing materials such as soybean meal. However, in order to defuse the post-August 2015 bomb, the decision with regard to the present article has been to combine retail poultry feed production with its integrated components. There are a number of key data points in Table 1 which deserve


explanation. Production of cattle and calf feeds fell significantly in 1997,


a development that continued for the rest of the decade. Average production of cattle and calf feeds in Great Britain for the years 1997 through 2011 amounted to 3.72 million tonnes, compared to 4.04 million tonnes in the five years 1992 through 1996. To a significant extent, this reflected changes in the milk quota arrangements. However, there were also reductions in the support prices for cereals, beef and butter, these support price reductions being compensated for by a per hectare payment in the case of cereals, and increased premium payments for beef cows and cattle. These measures were introduced from 1994. Cattle and calf feeds consist of two distinct feed types: feeds for


dairy cows and feeds for beef animals. Subsequent to the CAP reforms of 1992 which were implemented in a phased programme from 1994 onwards, output of compounds for dairy cows fell from 2.95 million tonnes in 1993 to 2.23 million tonnes in 1998, a decline of 24 per cent. Part of this decline was offset by the introduction of blended feeds, first picked up by DEFRA’s statisticians in 1995. However, production of blends averaged just 230,000 tonnes a year between 1996 and 2002, a total insufficient to compensate for the decline in the production of dairy compounds. However, subsequent to 2002 and particularly after 2006, output


of dairy blends started to pick up significantly. This is likely to have reflected, at least in part, pressure on milk prices – pressures that were, predictably, set for a further increase on 31 March 2016 when the EU’s system of milk quotas, introduced in 1984, came to an end. Production of compound feeds for non-dairy adult cattle reached


a peak of 834,100 tonnes in 1994. Then, as a result of changes to the CAP’s beef regime, production fell to a low of 605,000 tonnes just four years later, since when it has averaged 646,000 tonnes. Production of blended feeds for non-dairy cattle picked up very much quicker than those destined for use in dairy nutrition; in 2006, output of non-dairy blends amounted to 279,000 tonnes out of a total of 898,000 tonnes total manufactured feeds for non-dairy animals. The 300,000-tonne barrier was broken, if temporarily, in 2010 and, since then, production of blended feeds for non-dairy cattle has average 347,500 tonnes a year, constituting 35 per cent of all manufactured feeds for non-dairy cattle during the years between 2011 and 2016. Inevitably, as will always be the case under present conditions,


weather will play a role in the feed requirements of ruminant livestock.


FEED COMPOUNDER MARCH/APRIL 2017 PAGE 19


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