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FACTS FROM FIGURES GOODBYE 2016 By Roger W Dean, Dean Agricultural Associates


On the face of it, the 11.14 million tonnes that feed manufacturers in Great Britain produced in 2016 represented a record unequalled since DEFRA and its predecessor, MAFF started to publish data on compound feed production in Great Britain in its current format. As any feed manufacturer well knows, there are many factors that affect output of feed for any particular category of livestock. Not least is the fact of competition between feed manufacturers for the available business. Demand for any particular livestock category will also bear on the market as will the great unknown, notably in the case of ruminant livestock, of weather, an increasingly salient feature of the last few years. With all these features in play, analysis of the market for animal feeds is a fraught enterprise. Roger Dean has been pouring over the latest available data for feed production in Great Britain.


It needs to be said that, actually, this is not quite the end of 2016 as far as the feed industry in the UK is concerned. This article deals with Great Britain; the feed industry in Northern


ending 31 December 2016, production of ‘retail’ compound, blends and concentrates stood at its highest level since DEFRA’s records started to be kept in their present form in 1992, albeit the available data would suggest that the total for 2016 may have been exceeded during the high-water, pre-milk quota year of 1983. There are, however, additional quantities of livestock feed to be


considered in the context of Great Britain. These are production from the Integrated Poultry Mills which produce feed to their own appropriate specifications. The prior assumption underlying enumerating these as a separate


Ireland reports separately. At 11,142,200 tonnes in the twelve months Table 1: Feed Production in Great Britain by Main Product Groups 1992 - 2016 Year


1992 1995 1996 1997 2000 2010 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016


Cattle & Calf Feed 3,860.9 4,172.3 4,112.4 3,616.8 3,586.9 3,885.0 4,019.6 4,283.9 4,175.7 4,073.4 3,921.5


Pig Feed


2,249.1 2,243.0 2,337.3 2,470.6 1,983.3 1,464.3 1,693.0 1,682.0 1,821.0 1,878.2 1,814.4


Source: DEFRA Survey Data PAGE 18 MARCH/APRIL 2017 FEED COMPOUNDER


Poultry Feed


2,737.4 2,775.0 2,761.2 2,816.9 2,578.7 3,144.9 3,169.5 3,310.6 3,333.0 3,574.5 3,985.5


Sheep Feed 540.4 634.5 703.7 617.4 678.4 794.9 767.1 890.2 704.7 711.7 796.8


Horse Feed 145.8 162.1 168.1 161.2 181.5 196.5 178.9 195.2 174.1 184.7 187.1


source of feed production was that, as integrated units, these mills would produce feeds solely for their own use rather than participating in the retail market for feeds. However, nothing in the feed industry is that simple. In fact, it emerged that some integrated poultry units were producing feed that ended up not being used by their own poultry flocks but were entering the retail feed market. It is not clear whether these feeds were disposed into the retail market as being, for example, ‘surplus to requirements’ or, alternatively, were being specifically ordered by poultry producers as part of their feed procurement procedures. However, and as DEFRA put it, ‘We have reviewed some IPU’s (Integrated Poultry Units) which produce both feed for their own use and feed for retail sale. We have adjusted the data from August 2015 which has resulted in an increase in compound poultry feed and a decrease in IPU feed’.


Other Compounds, Blends and Concentrates 203.0 269.1 318.4 333.6 307.4 362.1 377.6 402.2 389.4 412.2 436.9


Total Compounds, Blends and Concentrates 9,736.7 10,256.0 10,401.0 10,016.4 9,316.4 9,847.9 10,205.8 10,764.1 10,598.1 10,834.3 11,142.2


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