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COMMUNICATIONS & NETWORKS


Ruggedised RTU technology focuses on capturing data in real-time


Protocols — IEC-60870-5-104, SNMP, Modbus RTU/TCP — were chosen to allow the management of downstream


communication with the equipment, sensors and broadcasting devices, as well as to interact upstream with the SCADA control technology. These kinds of solutions are suitable for mobile telephony infrastructure, audio-visual broadcasting networks, smart grid technology, IoT and security. This customer went on to deploy the technology in over 250 sites and continues to use it in other locations.


Companies in the broadcast sector are demanding more (and ‘smarter’) information, and as a result, RTUs will be deployed in greater numbers. It’s worth bearing in mind that currently most RTUs are only used for operations, although they can support maintenance teams, health and safety initiatives and environmental management. As networks grow and increase in size


through more connected devices, managing the greater number of assets will become


increasingly difficult through traditional, non- technology methods such as scheduled service engineer visits. And, mergers between companies that span continents and sharing of assets such as masts will require a technological approach because central management will increasingly require remote data acquisition. Set against this is the fact that RTUs are a cost-effective way of collecting large amounts of data, meaning a relatively low investment cost for the benefits they deliver will make them a more attractive


proposition on a wider range of assets. With broadcast’s geographically spread assets and multiple process that all generate massive amounts of data, key to ensuring these improvements is being able to capture and interpret it in real-time. Latest, ruggedised RTU technology focuses specifically on that, helping operators meet their investor and customer commitments.


Ovarro www.ovarro.com


Cat Pumps Pressure Regulators Cat Pumps®


regulators have advances in regulator technology that offer superior operating performance (especially in arduous conditions) and ensure for a smoother, longer lasting, more precise pressure regulation of high-pressure liquid systems.


Typical Usage: Pressure regulation of high-pressure liquid systems.


Benefits:


• Conical design lowers minimum required bypass flow from 10 to 5%, which provides more consistent pressure.


• Lower override pressure compared to competitive designs provides system protection and reduces wear and energy cost.


• Superior valve design provides smooth, stable service with quiet operation and no chatter.


• Compact in-line design for easy mounting.


Available Materials: • Available in steel/nickel-plated, 304 and 316 stainless steel.


• Elastomers are available in medium nitrile (NBR), fluorocarbon (FPM), and ethylene propylene diene monomer (EPDM).


Cat Pumps — Protecting your Pumping Systems. UK: +44 1252 622031 | sales@catpumps.co.uk | www.catpumps.co.uk


©2021 Cat Pumps (U.K.) Ltd. All Rights Reserved. 21067 4/21 PC-JUL21-CAT PUMPS.indd 1 26/07/2021 11:48 JULY/AUGUST 2021 | PROCESS & CONTROL 27 Pressure: 7–690 bar | Flow Rate: 0–390 lpm


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