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CONTENTS


Meeting the zero carbon challenge T


he government surprised many people last month when outgoing Prime Minister, Theresa May, announced that it is taking the Committee on Climate Change’s (CCC) advice and laying legislation to commit the UK to becoming the world’s first zero carbon major economy by 2050. Mrs May went on to state that this legislation will mean that the UK is on track to become the first G7 country to legislate for net zero emissions, with other major economies expected to follow suit. Whether they will or not remains to be seen, so the government has said it will conduct a further assessment within five years to confirm that other countries are taking similarly ambitious action.


While many will applaud the government’s ambition and see it as the right way to go, meeting this target presents a major challenge for all concerned. Representatives from many of the country’s leading engineering organisations were quick to comment on the government’s announcement, with most agreeing that committing to net zero by 2050 is a very ambitious and complex challenge, but one that engineers have to be at the heart of. And while the technology and approaches that will deliver net zero are now understood, which is crucial, strong policy leadership will be required to ensure they are implemented. Most people I’ve spoken to since the government’s announcement see it as a positive move and a good first step on what is hoped will be the UK’s journey to net zero


From the Editor


carbon. They also agree that reaching this target is quite a daunting prospect and presents significant challenges, especially as the UK is drastically short of the infrastructure, supply and installation capacity needed to introduce low-carbon building heating at scale. As the ECA noted in its response, the country also faces major ‘low carbon’ skills gaps across the building design, construction and installation sectors. We also need to ensure that whatever happens in the years ahead delivers the quality and performance necessary for whole-life low carbon buildings. There are of course many other


areas that the government will need to focus on, such as reducing domestic emissions,


decarbonisation of the grid, and the full electrification of public transport. But with this legislation now in place, the UK is on track to lead on carbon reduction and our engineers will be at the forefront and play a significant part in reaching this ambitious net zero target.


Neil Mead, Editorial Director Editor: Neil Mead


nmead@datateam.co.uk Tel: 01622 699110


Business Director: Jacqui Henderson


jhenderson@datateam.co.uk Tel: 01622 699116


Circulation


Curwood CMS Ltd datateam@c-cms.com Tel: 01580 883844


The Editor and Publisher do not necessarily agree with the views expressed by contributors, nor do they accept responsibility for any errors in the transmission of the subject matter in this publication. In all matters, the Editor’s decision is final. This issue includes editorial and imagery provided and paid for by suppliers.


Total average net circulation: ABC 17,291 January to


December 2018 ISSN 1042-310


Published by Datateam Business Media Limited


15a London Road, Maidstone, Kent, ME16 8LY Tel: 01622 687031 Fax: 01622 757646


Printed in Great Britain by Precision Colour Printing


8 12 THIS MONTH


4 INDUSTRY NEWS Latest news, industry updates and appointments


8 DOMESTIC & RESIDENTIAL MVHR systems in small homes: Three key criteria for success


9 DOMESTIC & RESIDENTIAL Data to revolutionise low carbon home heating solutions


10 DOMESTIC & RESIDENTIAL Low noise solution for residential conversion project


11 RENEWABLES Solar, so good


12 RENEWABLES Biomethane refuelling stations help drive towards lower emissions


14 RENEWABLES Talking trash: Why steam could be the hidden gem of your biomass heating system


15 INDUSTRY COMMENT: ECA A zero carbon UK by 2050?


16 BOILERS & HOT WATER Building breakdown: Key considerations when specifying hot water solutions


18 BOILERS & HOT WATER Balancing the cost of sustainability and commercial heating demands


20 BOILERS & HOT WATER Are you MCPD ready?


21 BOILERS & HOT WATER Why the size of a water heater matters


22 BOILERS & HOT WATER Pristine performance: Keeping commercial heating systems clean


24 BUILDING CONTROLS Bucking the trend


Read the latest at: www.bsee.co.uk


25 INDUSTRY COMMENT: BCIA Night of pride


26 BUILDING CONTROLS Reaching the ‘gold standard’ in health and safety


27 AIR CONDITIONING & AIR 28 AIR CONDITIONING & 29 AIR CONDITIONING & 30 AIR CONDITIONING & 31 ENVIRONMENTAL


QUALITY Enjoying more efficient summer comfort


AIR QUALITY Maintaining climate control for specialist medical imaging engineers


AIR QUALITY Grilles and diffusers help luxury London apartments see the light


AIR QUALITY A masterclass in low energy ventilation for classrooms


ENGINEERING Practical fastenings make light work of solar industry applications


32 VENTILATION Upgraded fans slice energy bills for Pizza Hut


33 VENTILATION Modular fans provide a smart solution and high efficiency heat recovery ventilation units


34 INSTALLATION NEWS 37 WHAT’S NEW?


41 WEB LOCATOR, RECRUITMENT & TRAINING 42 CLASSIFIED


BUILDING SERVICES & ENVIRONMENTAL ENGINEER JULY 2019 3 24


Colour reproduction: Design & Media Solutions. © Datateam Business Media Ltd


BSEE


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