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BSEE Advertorial L


ight Efficient Design UK has launched a new range of ultrabright LED retrofit High Bays, expertly engineered to work efficiently in open fixtures


while also affording protection from insects and dust. Designed for use in such large area environments as


shopping malls, warehouses and factory floors, the easy to fit E40 range includes 4000 and 5000K models delivering 80+ CRI in operating temperatures of 40°F to 122F°. Available in 90W, 135W and 150W variants replacing up


to 400W HID, the LED8130 model also includes an uplight feature for maximising light output. Rated IP20 with dual stage MOV protection with integrated 6kA surge, this new


Tamlite Lighting is first manufacturer to be


granted ICEL certification via LIAQA Scheme


WHAT’S NEW SPONSORED BY


Light Efficient Design UK announces new high performance LED Retrofit High Bays


lower cost range features dynamic temperature control for ensuring a longer, brighter lifetime. Pretested and potted drivers are burnt in 3x prior to shipping and protected against vibration and moisture. Low maintenance is assured with a 50,000 hour rated


lamp life and products are backed by a five year warranty. Light Efficient Design UK’s Newburybased warehouse offers prompt delivery to UK/Ireland electrical wholesalers on all Light Efficient Design retrofit LED products. For further information:


www.ledllc.com


Hoval launches Large Space Heating system for warehouses


ATAG Commercial helps heat Bristol Grammar School


from ATAG Commercial have been installed at Bristol Grammar School in University Road, Bristol, as part of an extensive heating system refurbishment. Seven of the XL140 boilers are in the school’s main plantroom, while the other two are located in the Sixth Form Block. There are two XL70 units in the Junior & Infant Block, with the remaining pair housed in the school’s Princess Anne Building. The boilers were fitted by Bristolbased Octagon Heating Services Ltd. The XL140 boilers in the main


N


plantroom were installed with a plate heat exchanger instead of a low velocity header, allowing the school’s heating system to remain openvented and the boiler circuit pressurised. Plus,


ine XL140 and four XL70 boilers


the plate heat exchanger also protects the new boilers from any debris entering them from the old heating system. Commenting on


the installation, Julian Hopkins,


Managing Director, Octagon Heating Services Ltd, said: “The XL140s were chosen for this particular project due to the combination of their high efficiency, reliability, 5year warranty and prefabricated header system.” Julian added: “ATAG Commercial


boilers boast low NOx values, whereas some of the original units from the school used pressure jet type burners; as a result, any emissions would naturally have been reduced. In addition, fuel savings are regularly achieved when we replace aged boilers with newer, Arated models.” For more information visit:


www.atagcommercial.co.uk


Emergency Lighting) certification for the manufacture and testing of quality luminaires. Tamlite is the first lighting manufacturer to have been


T


granted ICEL membership via the Lighting Industry Association Quality Assurance (LIAQA) Scheme. The ICEL is a division of the Lighting Industries


Association (LIA), representing the highest level of legislation in terms of luminaire quality, specialising in emergency lighting. Membership of the ICEL confirms that Tamlite’s technologies and solutions are designed to be effective in the event of an emergency or loss of mains power, allowing a building’s occupants to evacuate quickly and safely. John Allden, Tamlite Lighting’s Managing Director,


commented: “Tamlite Lighting was a founding participant of the LIAQA scheme, and we have always been committed to its purpose. The ICEL certification offers proof that we maintain extremely high standards within the manufacturing process of our emergency luminaires – and this gives our customers an added level of confidence. It is fair to say, reliability and quality are core aspects of our culture at Tamlite – we see both values as an essential pillars of our business practises.”


www.tamlite.co.uk


Chambers in Glasgow. Built in 1899, this handsome red Dumfries


B


sandstone listed building has been refitted by the property firm Dunaskin Properties Ltd to provide modern office accommodation for several local businesses. Originally built by the Victorian developer


Duncan McNaughton, it is a familiar landmark close to Glasgow Central railway station. The sixstorey building retains many of its original features including its striking façade with ornate stonework and mosaic floor tiled entrance foyer. The striking atrium that extends down to the


ground floor continues to provide plenty of natural daylight too, but the addition of LED lighting has added a more modern feel. The building also now boasts a coffee shop for the use of tenants and modernised building services, including the latest in heating technology. Three Lochinvar TTB 410 gasfired boilers


providing a total of 1.2MW of heat output were specified because of their efficiency, flexibility and ease of operation. These fully condensing, gasfired, stainless steel, floor standing boilers have low NOx emissions and can achieve efficiencies up to 95.5% gross CV. Their ability to modulate during operation


was of particular interest to the contractor G8 Energy Solutions of Hamilton. The threeboiler


amlite Lighting, one of the UK’s largest privatelyowned lighting companies, has secured ICEL (Industry Committee for


H


oval has launched a modular, scalable solution for heating and ventilating warehouses and other ‘shed’ type buildings of any size and height, providing significantly improved control of thermal stratification compared to conventional


systems. Providing the best features of both centralised and decentralised systems, the Hoval Large Space Heating system simplifies planning and tendering whilst also reducing project implementation times. The system is based on a threemodule concept configurable depending on requirements;


the UltraGas condensing gas boiler feeding TopVent units for recirculation or RoofVent units if air changes are required. All of these products are controlled by the TopTronic C zone control system – all fully ErP 2018 compliant. If heat pumps are the approach on the project instead of gas boilers then RoofVent RP


and TopVent TP are decentralised units combined with air source heat pumps to provide heating or cooling. Existing heating or cooling solutions from other manufacturers can also be interlinked with RoofVent and TopVent. Thermal stratification is minimised by the Air Injector vortex air distributor in TopVent and


RoofVent units, which enables easy adjustment of the air stream range from 4m to 25m and regulates the scatter angle (induction) of the air stream as a function of the mounting height. Temperature stratification is thereby limited to 0.15K per mounting height metre (K/m) – compared with up to 1.0 K/m in conventional systems. In conjunction with temperature and timebased zone control, the heating times and hall


temperatures can be optimally adapted to the logistical and energyrelated requirements. Due to the high ventilation efficiency of the TopVent recirculation heating units, the Hoval solution makes do with fewer units and lower air flow rates than conventional recirculation heaters. This reduces investment, installation and operating costs. Further information:


www.hoval.co.uk Lochinvar boilers heat historic Glasgow office


anburybased Lochinvar has supplied three high efficiency, condensing boilers to the newly refurbished Baltic


S


wegon has been awarded Sweden’s prestigious Great Indoor Climate Prize for its


WISE ‘smart’ ventilation system. Established in 2001, the


award is given annually to organisations in the Swedish indoor climate, energy and plumbing sectors, who have developed a significant product, service or methodology that also has sound practical applications. Set up by Slussen Building


Services, Swedish Ventilation, the Energy and Environmental Technology Association and the Swedish Cooling Association, the prize aims to “increase interest in indoor climate technology, strengthen its position and promote a healthy indoor climate in energy efficient buildings”. This year’s prize was awarded


modular installation offers a 24:1 turndown allowing the system to respond precisely to changes in demand while minimising energy consumption – a particularly useful feature in a building occupied by multiple tenants with long, varied working hours. The contractor also found that the boilers


were easy to manoeuvre during installation as they are relatively lightweight and are fitted with castors for ease of handling and positioning avoiding the need for lifting equipment. In addition, they feature onboard controls, twin burners for builtin standby and a highly reliable triple chamber, stainless steel heat exchanger. Lochinvar’s TTB boilers are suitable for a wide variety of commercial and industrial


40 BUILDING SERVICES & ENVIRONMENTAL ENGINEER JULY 2019


heating applications and come in outputs ranging from 418 to 576 kW. According to the Baltic Chambers’


website, when the building was first opened in 1899 it featured engineering that was clearly cutting edge for the late Victorian era including “a complete system of electric lighting, besides gaspiping for fires, etc. where required”. Today, the building retains much of its


original character and charm, while the significantly upgraded heating and other modern amenities provide comfortable and productive conditions for its occupants.


www.lochinvar.ltd.uk


to Swegon’s vice president of sales Northern Europe & Group Marketing Kent Granljung by Annika Christensson, Head of Health and Construction at Boverket, during a gala event at the Munich Brewery in Stockholm. The judges selected the WISE


system because of its innovative design and ability to provide a flexible and comprehensive solution for ventilation, heating and comfort cooling. They were impressed by its use of wireless communication between components and subsystems.


By using demand controlled


ventilation (DCV) in this way, Swegon has developed a system that cuts up to 80% of the fan energy and 40% of the cooling and heating energy in a building, by supplying air, cooling and heating in just the right amounts, in the right places and at the right time. The judges were impressed


that the WISE system builds on the experience gained from thousands of installations to simplify the delivery of DCV with a quick to install and commission, highly flexible and simple to operate approach. WISE products, such as dampers


and diffusers, communicate via a ‘selfhealing’ wireless network to deliver complete climate control for entire buildings seamlessly linking software with the hardware used for both airborne and waterborne indoor climate. The network allows the installation to be commissioned without communication cabling, which reduces time, cost and complexity while also making it very simple to operate and adapt to future changes in building layout or operation. The judges said WISE was


“well placed to contribute to a comfortable indoor climate in a wide range of energy efficient buildings”.


www.swegon.co.uk Read the latest: www.bsee.co.uk


Swegon wins Sweden’s 'great indoor climate prize'


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