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BSEE WATER TREATMENT


By Sco Brannigan, Technical Sales Manager, Hydrotec UK*.


include filtration, disinfection, use of ozone and granular activated carbon, chemical additives, as well as frequent water quality testing monitoring and


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appropriate corrective measures – with compliance being closely monitored by the Drinking Water Inspectorate (DWI).


There are more than 700,000km of mains and sewers beneath us, which is 200 times greater than the UK’s motorway network. This vast system is not impervious to environmental ingress, typically dirt, remains from ground work or even material leaching from the network itself, which makes guaranteeing the water quality that arrives to you difficult.


As well as the local water authority treating your water, water treatment specialists can offer supplementary technologies to ensure your water quality is maintained, bearing in mind that once the water reaches you it is no longer subject to the same regulations as the water carrier. However there are standards, regulations and guidance you can follow to reduce the risk to public health and maintain water quality.


WRAS approval


Firstly, there is WRAS approval. This is granted directly by representatives of the water suppliers and it is, therefore, accepted by every water supplier in the UK. This provides assurance that the product/material has no detrimental effect to the quality of water.


The process requires testing all materials comprising a products construction by an independent test house; an application is then made to the Water Regulation Advisory Scheme for review and if satisfied, WRAS approval is granted.


uIn addion to the local water authority treang your water, water treatment specialists can oer supplementary technologies to ensure your water quality is maintained.


It is worth noting that only the manufacturer/factor listed on the online WRAS Products and Materials Database can supply the product as WRAS approved. A WRAS certificate itself is not evidence of valid approval. For a distributor to rebrand or supply a WRAS approved product under another name they must seek ‘secondary product approval’. If granted, they will be listed as a


ocal water authorities work hard to ensure that water is safe and complies with the Water Supply (Water Quality) Regulations. This may


Adversing: 01622 699116 Editorial: 01354 461430


THE IMPORTANCE OF COMPLIANCE A guide to maintaining water quality


‘factor’ on the WRAS Products and Materials Database. The installation of non-WRAS approved


products/materials in a domestic water system may contravene Water Supply (Water Fittings) Regulations. Secondly, the HSE L8 Approved Code of Practice and HSG274 provides technical guidance to reduce the risk of legionella in cooling systems, hot and cold water systems as well as other “at risk” systems. This information is available free of charge in electronic format from the HSE. Non-compliance with the guidance is not itself against the law, however if appropriate measures are not taken and effectively recorded and legionella has been found to be the cause of illness or even death, the designated duty holder may be prosecuted as all guidance ties in directly to the Health and Safety at Work Act. In the event of a death, an individual or organisation could be found guilty of corporate manslaughter,


In relation to water treatment there are a number of technologies recognised in the L8 ACOP, these are as follows: u Temperature Regime u Biocide Treatment u Chlorine Dioxide u Copper Silver Ionisation u Chlorine u Silver Stabilised Hydrogen Peroxide Supplementary measures include:


u Point of use filter u Ozone and UV Treatment The above technologies all have their own features and benefits; some require special control and monitoring for their use to comply with additional regulations and legislation. I recommend you consult a water treatment specialist to determine the most suitable technology for your application.


National Health premises and other Department of Health sites must comply with HTM04-01. We recommend consulting a water treatment specialist when selecting suitable water treatment technologies for these building types.


International standards


Finally, there are international performance and material standards. These can offer assurance of the efficacy and safety of products, typically achieved by the testing of a product/material against the criteria defined by the standard with appropriate success criteria demonstrating compliance. This should be carried out by an independent test facility and the most applicable to the UK would be the British Standard which, since harmonisation of standards in Europe, has been partly superseded by relevant European Standards (EN). There are a number of BS EN Standards applicable to water treatment equipment, which are generally categorised as “Water Conditioning Equipment”. These include, but are not limited to: u BS EN 14897:2006+A1:2007 – Water conditioning equipment inside buildings. Devices using mercury low- pressure ultraviolet radiators.


28 BUILDING SERVICES & ENVIRONMENTAL ENGINEER APRIL 2018


Requirements for performance, safety and testing. This specific standard demonstrates the biocidal potency of such devices during operation. u BS EN 14743:2005+A1:2007 – Water conditioning equipment inside buildings. Softeners. Requirements for performance, safety and testing (Also see DIN 19636-100:2008-02 water softeners (cation exchangers) in drinking water installations – Part 100: Requirements for the use of water softeners according to DIN EN 14743). This standard demonstrates water and salt use efficiency as well as biological integrity. u BS EN 14095:2003 – Water conditioning equipment inside buildings. Electrolytic treatment with aluminium anodes. Requirements for performance, safety and testing. u BS EN 15848:2010 – Water conditioning equipment inside buildings. Adjustable chemical dosing systems. Requirements for performance, safety and testing. In the absence of an applicable British Standard, there are standards such as NSF/ANSI and DVGW standards of performance, which offer assurances as to the efficacy of certain water treatment technologies. To ensure you are using the most effective water treatment technology, consult your water treatment specialist and enquire into the existence of applicable standards and more importantly, if their services/products meet these.


The importance of guidance, legislation and regulation is paramount in reducing the risks to public health as well as safeguarding the end-user’s investment in these technologies. When selecting water treatment, we strongly believe it is worth considering the following: u Does the equipment have approval relevant to or meet the necessary standard for the application in which it is being used? u Does the equipment have evidence demonstrating stated safety and performance? u If this product is being used for drinking water, does the manufacturer/distributor hold the necessary product approval?


*Hydrotec designs and manufactures water treatment products for the building services industry.


www.hydrotec.co.uk VISIT OUR WEBSITE: www.bsee.co.uk


uThere are standards, regulaons and guidance you can follow to reduce the risk to public health and maintain water quality.





There are more than 700,000km of mains and sewers beneath us, which is 200 mes greater than the UK’s motorway network. This vast system is not impervious to environmental ingress, typically dirt, remains from ground work or even material leaching from the network itself, which makes guaranteeing the water quality that arrives to you dicult.





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