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Displays


Rock solid reliability


Rugged touchscreens from Zytronic are helping to improve quarry efficiency


largest construction material supplier, Boral Limited, decided to apply ‘smart’ technologies. As a result, haulage drivers now use specially designed kiosks, with Zytronic’s interactive touch sensors, at Boral’s incoming and outgoing weighbridges to avoid bottlenecks. As Australia’s leading supplier of building


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material and aggregates, Boral has over 100 huge quarries, mining stone, gravel and sand for a wide variety of construction projects. To put the scale of Boral’s mining output into context, during the construction of the Ichthys LNG onshore process facilities at Bladin Point near Darwin, Boral’s Northern Territory quarries supplied up to 5,000 tonnes of aggregate per day. With each of the huge mining trucks capable of carrying a payload of nearly 95 tonnes, over 50 trucks filled up at the quarries each day for this project alone. Efficiently and quickly logging and directing


each truck to the correct loading station is crucial in modern, automated mining operations. Furthermore, monitoring the weights on each truck entering and leaving a site is essential. However, the traditional system for manually processing each truck at a stand-alone weighbridge and associated office, takes considerable time and, during busy periods, creates a huge bottleneck


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hen looking to speed up the flow of trucks checking into its busy mines and quarries, Australia’s


with trucks sometimes waiting hours. Automation and the implementation of


Industry 4.0 data and analytics are already helping transform Boral’s business, speeding up processes and reducing cost. The company’s vision for the Smart Quarry is to measure its output performance in dollars per hour instead of tonnage per hour. Crucial to this goal is for Boral to simplify and speed up the throughput of trucks entering its quarries and mines and for this, they turned to technology integration company, TouchMate. A specialist in self-service kiosks, TouchMate


(headquartered in Brisbane) designs and produces its products in-house. With manufacturing facilities in both Australia and the United States and already thousands of installations across the globe, the company has


‘‘


the experience and skills to install and commission a fully functioning kiosk with a proven track record of reliability and innovation. The initial brief was to build a bespoke


quarry truck ‘check-in’ kiosk that was rugged enough to operate reliably in the harshest of environments, as the units would be deployed in remote quarries across Australia, which has several different climate zones. In the Northern Territories, which has a more tropical influenced climate, summers can be hot and humid, while in the southern parts winters are sometimes rainy. Whereas in the outback areas of central Australia, temperatures can reach over 50°C. Furthermore, dirt, grit and dust whipped up from the quarry by passing trucks was also a factor to consider.


The reliable and robust nature of


Zytronic’s touch sensors has once again proven their worth for our business. There are now hundreds of these quarry check-in kiosks deployed in some pretty extreme Australian conditions.


’’ March 2021 Instrumentation Monthly


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