search.noResults

search.searching

saml.title
dataCollection.invalidEmail
note.createNoteMessage

search.noResults

search.searching

orderForm.title

orderForm.productCode
orderForm.description
orderForm.quantity
orderForm.itemPrice
orderForm.price
orderForm.totalPrice
orderForm.deliveryDetails.billingAddress
orderForm.deliveryDetails.deliveryAddress
orderForm.noItems
IN THE NEWS


BRITAIN’S LONGEST-SUFFERING COVID PATIENT FACES BANKRUPTCY AS HE CAN NO LONGER DRIVE A TAXI


Britain’s longest-suffering Covid patient has revealed he may be forced to de- clare bankruptcy because his condition means he’s unable to work. Ali Sakallioglu, 57, from Catford, Lon- don, spent a total of 222 days in hospi- tal after contracting the virus in March. As previously reported in PHTM, during his time in hospital he had a heart at- tack, suffered a stroke, collapsed lungs, multiple organ failure and sepsis, and his children were told to say their last goodbyes three times. MailOnline reports that grandfather-of- nine Ali, was discharged from hospital in November, and told how he came home to a mountain of bills. Speaking to BBC Breakfast this morn- ing recently, he admitted the situation is ‘very difficult’, adding: “We’re all writ- ing them letters and whatnot, I’m think- ing about going bankrupt because I have no other choice.


“I can’t afford to pay my bills, I’m not working. I take life day by day, that’s the only way to do it. I don’t think about the future because I don’t know what the future’s going to bring.” Ali said he struggles to dress himself and can’t even cook or walk up the stairs, never mind drive a taxi. Ali, who has Type 1 diabetes, developed Covid-19 symptoms at the end of March - when Britain was first plunged into a


national lockdown. He was told to self- isolate, but he was rushed to hospital at the beginning of April after his symp- toms got worse and put on a ventilator. Ali was later rushed to King’s College Hospital, in Camberwell, for surgery after suffering a heart attack and was placed into an induced coma. “I managed to ring my daughter to say they’re going to put me in a coma, tell everyone I love them and hopefully I’ll see you on the other side,’ he told the BBC. “And obviously when I woke up it was three months later... They told my kids I wasn’t going to make it.” His children all wore full PPE as they said goodbye to their father, but against all the odds he pulled through. After three months in a coma he was eventually moved to a nursing home to help with his rehabilitation, including regaining his ability to walk.


WELLINGBOROUGH PH FIRM TRAINS DRIVERS TO ASSIST PASSENGERS WITH EXTRA CARE NEEDS


A Wellingborough PH firm has used time freed up by lockdown to train drivers to start an assisted travel service for pas- sengers with additional care needs. The Northamptonshire Telegraph re- ports that Simply Cabs has enrolled their drivers on online First Aid courses and Passenger Assistant Training Schemes to enable the business to offer a new ‘Assisted Travel’ service. The have diversified from airport trans- fers to provide bespoke transport for people needing a closer level of care than some taxi firms may be able or willing to provide. Nick Finn, co-director said: “I want to care for people, to look after people. I saw that there was a gap in the market.” Simply Cabs, will be working closely with local authority care homes, hospi-


FEBRUARY 2021


tals and charities to offer a door-to- door service to the elderly or anyone who may have mobility issues. Mr Finn said: “Trained drivers will safely assist passengers from their front door to the waiting area of their appointment and even get them checked in. “Once the appointment is over, they will collect passengers from the waiting


area and take them home. If needed, they will also supply trained passenger assistants that can stay as travel com- panions throughout the whole day. To increase the scope of support they can provide, further training is already planned in this year for their drivers, in- cluding in mental health awareness, autism, cancer support and dementia awareness. Driver Sarah Mae said: “As a driver there is no better feeling than knowing you are helping people in the local commu- nity. It’s so rewarding for us drivers. “We already carried out a lot of care work so it was a natural progression to take on the extra training to offer a door-to-door service for the elderly.” The company is now hoping to set up its own training scheme for drivers.


23


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92  |  Page 93  |  Page 94  |  Page 95  |  Page 96  |  Page 97  |  Page 98  |  Page 99  |  Page 100  |  Page 101  |  Page 102