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14


SNAP CHAT


It’s a new year and a time to reflect on the progress and achievements of TAPA in 2018 and to look ahead to what’s on its global and regional agendas for 2019. Time then to catch up with the Association’s regional Chairs … Vigilant invited Thorsten Neumann, Chairman of TAPA EMEA and Tony Lugg, Chairman of TAPA APAC, to give us a quick summary of their highlights and objectives …


UP OR DOWN…


Let’s start with some numbers for the EMEA region for 2018 versus 2017


• Total Members = 560, a year-on-year increase of 5.3%


• FSR certifications = 674 in 65 countries, up 9.6%


• TSR certifications = 162 in 27 countries, up 33.9%


IN CONVERSATION:


THORSTEN NEUMANN TAPA EMEA


• Number of training participants = 19 training events; 225 FSR participants, 129 TSR and 9 PSR


• Cargo crime incident intelligence = we’re just crunching the numbers before publishing our 2018 Incident Information Service (IIS) Annual Report next month… but 2018 will be the highest-ever year for recorded cargo crime in EMEA in TAPA’s 22-year history.


MOST RECORDED…


• Type of incident = Theft from Vehicle continued to be the most reported type of cargo crime in our region and nearly all freight thefts involved offenders targeting delivery vehicles as opposed to facilities.


• Type of location = Again, unchanged year-on-year, Unsecured Parking places are where drivers, trucks and their loads are most at risk – but we’re starting to address this with our new Parking Security Requirements (PSR) which is increasing the number and visibility of secure parking locations in EMEA.


• Type of M.O = still Intrusion, mostly involving thieves slicing open the tarpaulins of stationary trucks or forcing open their rear doors by breaking locks and seals to reach the goods inside.


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