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Day-to-day fundraising Easy earners


Need a quick injection of cash, for minimal effort? Try one of these fuss-free fundraisers


more ideas? Visit our sister


site at pta.co.uk for other quick and easy ideas.


Need


Family photoshoots St Andrew’s Lower School,


4 1


Biggleswade (400 pupils): ‘We booked a local professional photographer for the day and families reserved 15-minute slots for £5, which was ours to keep. The photographer gave up her time for free, making money from photo orders. We gave the photographer's flyers to parents with an accompanying letter. After the shoot, she emailed everyone a code to go online to view their proofs, and they then ordered online or by phone. It’s an easy fundraiser for very little work... Last year we raised £225!’


Pop-up polar parlour! Cash in on the warmer weather (and keep pupils cool) by selling ice lollies. If freezer space is limited, run 'freeze pop Fridays'... Mr Freeze ice pops only need to be frozen on the day of your sale and are suitable for vegetarians and coeliacs. If freezer space isn't an issue then offer a choice of lollies. Buy from a wholesaler to ensure that nutritional information is printed on individual items. Sell immediately after school from cool boxes (nd a shady spot!), pricing your wares according to the size and brand of lolly. Promote your 'polar parlour' a few days beforehand and have plenty of small change in your oat!


5 2


Word in a word Derwent Lower School in


Bedfordshire (110 pupils): ‘To celebrate World Book Day we challenged children to find as many words in our school name “Derwent Lower School” as they could – the winner found 511! We advertised the activity in our newsletter a month in advance, then sent forms out on a Friday with a return date of the following Tuesday (these things often get overlooked if you give too much time). 24 children took part and received a certificate in assembly. The winner was given a £10 book token. Our word-in-a-word challenge was a very easy fundraiser, making £220 profit!’


3


Football scratchcards Charity scratchcards are


Matchbox challenge How many different items can


you fit into a standard-sized matchbox? Give each child a craft matchbox (Baker Ross sell 90 for £9.90) – so that they’re all the same size and you don’t have to dispose of matches. Download a letter explaining the challenge from pta.co.uk/sponsored. Specify any items that are NOT allowed, such as toenail clippings or bogeys! Children (and parents) will love raiding their houses for the smallest items they can find… from LEGO bricks to cardamom pods. Ask them to write a numbered list and submit their box, list and sponsor form by the deadline.


cheap to buy and offer a quick turnaround. Each card has from 20 to 80 football teams listed. Friends, family and neighbours pay £1 to write their name and phone number against their chosen team. Completed cards and money are then returned. The silver panel is scratched off to reveal the winning team and 50% of the money collected from each card is returned to the student to pass on to their winner. If 100 families take part, on cards with 30 teams, you raise £1,500! For more information go to pta.co.uk/easy-earners.


FundEd SPRING 2016 55


IMAGES: SHOWCAKE; RYAN MCVAY/THINKSTOCK.CO.UK; COURTESY OF BARRETT & COE


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