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* SOLUTIONS


• Pat your skin dry. Do not rub it. Be sure to dry the areas where water may collect, such as under your arms, under and between your breasts and between your toes. • Eat foods rich in omega-3 fatty acids, such as salmon, sardines, albacore tuna, mackerel, tofu and other types of soybeans, walnuts, flaxseed oil and other oils. This will help to keep your skin nourished. • Maintain blood glucose levels as close to normal as possible. • When the temperature drops and you turn on the heat, use a humidifier to add moisture to the air in your home. • Wear gloves and warm shoes or boots in winter. • Use a lip balm to avoid dry, chapped lips.


SKIN INFECTIONS You may develop blisters, sores or bumps on your skin that can get infected. Cuts can also be easily infected if you don’t clean and treat them, or don’t notice them due to nerve damage. If your skin does become infected, you may notice that it gets hot or swollen, develops blisters or a discharge. Infections can also be painful.


What to Do • Inspect your body daily for any changes to your skin, such as bumps, blisters, red spots, cuts or sores that could get infected. • Have your healthcare provider inspect your feet. • Keep blood glucose levels as close to normal as possible.


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• Treat cuts immediately. • If your skin does get infected, see your provider im- mediately.


OPEN SORES AND WOUNDS


Prolonged periods of high blood glucose can lead to poor circulation and nerve damage. This is one reason it’s so important to keep good control of your diabetes. Poor circulation and poor glucose control make it harder for the body to heal wounds, especially on the feet, and may lead to diabetic ulcers.


What to Do • Check for any cuts or wounds on a daily basis. If you have nerve damage, you may not feel any pain, and mi- nor cuts may go unnoticed. • Seek immediate medical care for any open sores or wounds. • Talk to your provider about how to better control blood glucose levels if you are having this problem.


SHIN SPOTS (DIABETIC DERMOPATHY) People with diabetes may notice spots and lines that form a slight depression in the skin, often on the shins but sometimes on the arms, thighs, trunk or other areas of the body. This is called diabetic dermopathy. These brown spots may fade or stay on the skin indefinitely without any other symptoms.


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