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* DISCOVERY Noteworthy New & diabetes prevention & treatment Recent developments in


PREDICTING AND DIAGNOSING TYPE 1 DIABETES IN ADULTS Researchers are developing better methods of predicting and diagnosing type 1 diabe- tes — particularly in adults who develop the disease but may initially be misdiagnosed with type 2.


In studies presented at the European Association for the Study of Diabetes (EASD) 2017 Annual Meet- ing in Lisbon, Portugal, in September, researchers shed light on how genetic profil- ing can increase our under- standing of the differences between people who develop type 1 diabetes as children and those who develop it as adults.


One study followed up on research, presented last year at the EASD Annual Meeting, which found that half of all people with type 1 diabetes develop the disease after the age of 30. The new study found differences in allele patterns between the two groups (children and adults with type 1). Alleles are vari- ant forms of genes.


The study identified which allele patterns were most predictive of people who would ultimately develop type 1 diabetes as adults, compared to those in people who would develop it as


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children. It also identified one genotype that appeared to be protective against type 1 throughout life.


The second study used genetic risk scores to predict the development of type 1 diabetes among people who tested positive for type 1 an- tibodies but who had not yet shown signs of illness. Type 1 diabetes often de- velops slower in adults than it does in children, so that insulin may not be immedi- ately necessary following diagnosis. Because of this, adults with type 1 diabetes are often misdiagnosed as having type 2. Genetic profil- ing could greatly reduce this confusion.


DOUBLE DUTY: METHODS FOR REDUCING OBESITY ALSO REDUCE DIABETES Research shows that weight loss, if you are obese, can be an effective strategy in helping to prevent type 2 diabetes for many people. But sometimes the treatments used to reduce weight can also assist in improving gly- cemic control, independent of weight loss.


One recent study found that the weight-loss drug lorcaserin — prescribed to control appetite by targeting hormones in the brain — also


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