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ISTOCK.COM


* HEALTHCARE


FAMILY PHYSICIAN The family physician is the cornerstone when it comes to caring for people with diabetes. One of the most important jobs of this provider is giving and monitoring routine screening. Tests include a urine microalbumin to check for damage to the kidneys, a frequent complication of diabetes. As blood sugar becomes elevated, the kidneys suffer the impact of Advanced Glycosylation End Products, or AGEs. AGEs can cause damage to other organs in the body as well, including blood vessels and the eyes. So an important way to prevent complications from diabetes is to control your blood sugar.


Generally checked in patients with diabetes


every three months, the hemoglobin A1C pro- vides an estimate of the range of blood sugar over that three-month period. Generally, red blood cells live for about 120 days, and the ones exposed to increasing levels of blood sugar will undergo a type of damage called glycosylation. The hemoglobin A1C is an extremely useful tool to determine whether your diabetes is be- ing adequately controlled, and can help deter- mine if a change in medication is necessary. Since people with diabetes are at an in- creased risk of having a heart attack or a stroke, their lipid profile is checked once a year to ensure that cholesterol is being managed well. Physicians frequently prescribe medica- tions known as statins to help reduce choles- terol that is too high.


30 takechargemag.com


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