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ISTOCK.COM


* SOLUTIONS


Pamper & Protect


Providing extra-special skincare when you have diabetes


Did you know that your skin is your body’s largest organ? Adults carry 8 pounds and 22 square feet of it. That’s a lot of real estate to protect. But if you have diabetes (and even if you don’t), protect it you must.


Diabetes affects many areas of your body, and your skin is no exception. When blood glucose levels get too high, you may experience a wide range of skin problems — including dryness, bumps, growths, sores, itchiness and infections, among others.


In fact, experiencing problems with your skin could be a sign that you need to adjust your diabetes management plan. Sometimes skin is- sues are among the first changes people notice when they’ve yet to discover they are living with diabetes.


Here are some of the most common skin prob- lems people with diabetes experience, and what to do to prevent and treat them.


DRY SKIN


When blood glucose levels rise, the body loses fluids, making skin dry. Neuropathy can also cause dry skin because the nerves in the legs and feet may fail to get the message to sweat. Not only is dry skin itchy and annoying, it can be dangerous for people with diabetes if it cracks and gets infected, particularly if there are damaged nerves that prevent you from noticing the condition.


What to Do


Moisturizing daily is one of the easiest ways to prevent dry skin, but there are other steps you can take as well. • Drink lots of fluids, particularly water. • Avoid very hot baths and showers. • Avoid soaps and shampoos with lots of chemicals. Wash with a mild soap, then rinse and dry thoroughly.


58 takechargemag.com


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