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SALES & MARKETING ALIGNMENT


Meanwhile, leading software vendors have been adopting a bottom-up approach to their SaaS offerings when selling to sales teams. By providing sales professionals with easy-to-use products that show their value almost immediately, they can reach more users with far less resources and effort than a traditional top-down go-to- market model.


This double-sided dynamic – sales


professionals gaining more influence over software purchasing decisions and vendors’ bottom-up strategy – is a radi- cal change in how companies evaluate and buy software for the sales force, and how software vendors sell to them. At a time when sales teams are even more remotely dispersed, the need to source and adopt best-in- class applications in a timely manner is imperative. Top-down SaaS can create delays with its long evaluation cycles and onboarding protocols, and may even result in poor end user adoption. Bottom-up SaaS lets users deploy and share applications with their peers in record time, where top- down can fall short.


MORE ON THE PERKS OF BOTTOM-UP


Why Ask Reps to Choose Software


POUYAN SALEHI


More than ever, the C-suite and executive decision makers are turning to sales teams for input when vetting software vendors. After all, who better un- derstands what kind of software is required to get the job done than sales professionals themselves? Because of this, salespeople today have more influ- ence when it comes to which software their com- pany ultimately chooses to purchase.


44 | JULY/AUGUST 2021 SELLING POWER © 2021 SELLING POWER. CALL 1-800-752-7355 FOR REPRINT PERMISSION.


The key benefit of bottom-up SaaS is that users can try products without the downtime of cumbersome integra- tions and onboarding processes often associated with top-down. It makes sense, after all. Think of your


life outside of work: We’ve all become accustomed to the consumer model of trying things on our own. For example, we download software (apps) on our mobile phones all the time. Could you imagine if that entailed hours of onboarding, training, and integration? Why then, should the applications we use at work be any different? There’s one major caveat: It’s only possible for users to quickly imple- ment these products when they are designed exceptionally well. This requires a change in mindset for most vendors, who can no longer rely on drip email campaigns to on- board new users. For the bottom-


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