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COACHING


How Microcoaching Can Take Your Sales Team to the Next Level


BY C. LEE SMITH


Effective sales coaching can lead to an increase of up to 23% in rep performance (according to Sales Management Association, 2018). One would logi- cally think that, with an impact like this, sales man- agers would spend more time coaching. In reality, however, the same study reveals that 76% of sales managers spent too little time coaching. The de- mands of the job – being constantly pulled into meetings, putting out fires, and feeling pressured to meet the short-term quota – make coaching less of a priority.


Not to mention, some sales manag- ers avoid coaching because they feel uncomfortable doing it. Another concern I hear from managers is that,


while their sales reps love the idea of professional development, they can’t afford to spend a lot of time away from selling.


42 | JULY/AUGUST 2021 SELLING POWER © 2021 SELLING POWER. CALL 1-800-752-7355 FOR REPRINT PERMISSION.


This is where microcoaching can help. I define “microcoaching” as short bursts of sales coaching that fill one-on-one coaching gaps personal- ized to the individual’s specific needs.


THE AVOIDABLE CONSEQUENCES If managers and reps are fortunate, they find time for coaching on a weekly basis. In reality, only 20% of reps get weekly coaching. SalesFuel’s latest Voice of the Sales Rep research shows that 30% of sales reps would appreciate more coaching. But 40% of “managers do not have time for standalone coaching” (ATD Research, 2019). This pervasive problem costs organizations money because reps aren’t working as effectively as they could. And sales organizations suffer when reps (38%) leave voluntarily be- cause they don’t think their company cares about them.


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